nerv-10q_20170930.htm

 

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UNITED STATES

SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION

Washington, D.C. 20549

 

FORM 10-Q

 

QUARTERLY REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(D) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934

For the quarterly period ended September 30, 2017

OR

TRANSITION REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(D) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934

For the transition period from                      to                     

Commission File No. 001-36517

 

Minerva Neurosciences, Inc.

(Exact Name of Registrant as Specified in its Charter)

 

 

Delaware

 

26-0784194

(State or Other Jurisdiction of
Incorporation or Organization)

 

(I.R.S. Employer
Identification No.)

 

 

1601 Trapelo Road, Suite 284
Waltham, MA

 

02451

(Address of Principal Executive Offices)

 

(Zip Code)

Registrant’s telephone number, including area code: (617) 600-7373

 

(Former Name, Former Address and Former Fiscal Year, if Changed Since Last Report)

 

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant (1) has filed all reports required to be filed by Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to file such reports), and (2) has been subject to such filing requirements for the past 90 days.    YES      NO 

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant has submitted electronically and posted on its corporate Web site, if any, every Interactive Data File required to be submitted and posted pursuant to Rule 405 of Regulation S-T (§229.405 of this chapter) during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to submit and post such files).    YES      NO 

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a large accelerated filer, an accelerated filer, a non-accelerated filer, a smaller reporting company or an emerging growth company. See the definitions of “large accelerated filer,” accelerated filer,” “smaller reporting company” and “emerging growth company” in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act.

 

Large accelerated filer

 

  

Accelerated filer

 

 

 

 

 

Non-accelerated filer

 

 (Do not check if smaller reporting company)

  

Smaller reporting company

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Emerging growth company

 

 

 

 

 

 

If an emerging growth company, indicate by check mark if the registrant has elected not to use the extended transition period for complying with any new or revised financial accounting standards provided pursuant to Section 13(a) of the Exchange Act.

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a shell company (as defined in Rule 12b-2 of the Act).    YES     NO  

The number of shares of Registrant’s Common Stock, $0.0001 par value per share, outstanding as of October 31, 2017 was 38,700,693.

 

 

 


 

INDEX TO FORM 10-Q

 

 

 

 

 

Page

 

 

PART I — Financial Information

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Item 1.

 

Financial Statements (unaudited):

 

4

 

 

Condensed Consolidated Balance Sheets as of September 30, 2017 and December 31, 2016

 

4

 

 

Condensed Consolidated Statements of Operations for the three and nine months ended September 30, 2017 and 2016

 

5

 

 

Condensed Consolidated Statement of Changes in Stockholders’ Equity for the nine months ended September 30, 2017 and 2016

 

6

 

 

Condensed Consolidated Statements of Cash Flows for the nine months ended September 30, 2017 and 2016

 

7

 

 

Notes to Condensed Consolidated Financial Statements

 

8

Item 2.

 

Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations

 

21

Item 3.

 

Quantitative and Qualitative Disclosures about Market Risk

 

30

Item 4.

 

Controls and Procedures

 

30

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

PART II — Other Information

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Item 1.

 

Legal Proceedings

 

31

Item 1A.

 

Risk Factors

 

31

Item 2.

 

Unregistered Sales of Equity Securities and Use of Proceeds

 

61

Item 3.

 

Defaults Upon Senior Securities

 

61

Item 4.

 

Mine Safety Disclosures

 

61

Item 5.

 

Other Information

 

61

Item 6.

 

Exhibits

 

62

 

 

 

 

 

SIGNATURES

 

63

 

 

 

2


 

Unless the context suggests otherwise, references in this Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q, or Quarterly Report, to "Minerva," the "Company," "we," "us," and "our" refer to Minerva Neurosciences, Inc. and, where appropriate, its subsidiaries.

This Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q contains forward-looking statements within the meaning of the Private Securities Litigation Reform Act of 1995, as amended. These forward-looking statements reflect our plans, estimates and beliefs. These statements involve known and unknown risks, uncertainties and other factors that may cause our actual results, performance or achievements to be materially different from any future results, performances or achievements expressed or implied by the forward-looking statements. In some cases, you can identify forward-looking statements by terms such as “anticipates,” “believes,” “could,” “estimates,” “expects,” “intends,” “may,” “plans,” “potential,” “predicts,” “projects,” “should,” “would” and similar expressions intended to identify forward-looking statements. Forward-looking statements reflect our current views with respect to future events and are based on assumptions and subject to risks and uncertainties. Because of these risks and uncertainties, the forward-looking events and circumstances discussed in this report may not transpire. These risks and uncertainties include, but are not limited to, the risks included in this Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q under Part II, Item IA, “Risk Factors.”

Given these uncertainties, you should not place undue reliance on these forward-looking statements. Also, forward-looking statements represent our estimates and assumptions only as of the date of this document. You should read this document with the understanding that our actual future results may be materially different from what we expect. Except as required by law, we do not undertake any obligation to publicly update or revise any forward-looking statements contained in this report, whether as a result of new information, future events or otherwise.

All trademarks, trade names and service marks appearing in this Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q are the property of their respective owners.

 

 

 

3


 

PART I – Financial Information

Item 1 – Financial Statements

MINERVA NEUROSCIENCES, INC.

Condensed Consolidated Balance Sheets

(Unaudited)

 

 

September 30,

 

 

December 31,

 

 

2017

 

 

2016

 

Assets

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Current assets

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Cash and cash equivalents

$

36,254,748

 

 

$

82,980,609

 

Marketable securities

 

96,675,088

 

 

 

-

 

Restricted cash

 

80,000

 

 

 

80,000

 

Prepaid expenses and other current assets

 

1,072,559

 

 

 

803,241

 

Total current assets

 

134,082,395

 

 

 

83,863,850

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Marketable securities - noncurrent

 

10,355,092

 

 

 

-

 

Equipment, net

 

330

 

 

 

9,640

 

In-process research and development

 

34,200,000

 

 

 

34,200,000

 

Goodwill

 

14,869,399

 

 

 

14,869,399

 

Total assets

$

193,507,216

 

 

$

132,942,889

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Liabilities and Stockholders’ Equity

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Current liabilities

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Notes payable - current portion

$

5,194,337

 

 

$

4,853,753

 

Accounts payable

 

1,503,412

 

 

 

1,468,341

 

Accrued expenses and other current liabilities

 

2,022,405

 

 

 

815,813

 

Accrued collaborative expenses - related party

 

-

 

 

 

2,547,952

 

Total current liabilities

 

8,720,154

 

 

 

9,685,859

 

Notes payable - noncurrent

 

-

 

 

 

3,841,062

 

Deferred taxes

 

13,433,760

 

 

 

13,433,760

 

Deferred revenue

 

41,175,600

 

 

 

-

 

Total liabilities

 

63,329,514

 

 

 

26,960,681

 

Commitments and contingencies

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Stockholders’ equity

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Preferred stock; $0.0001 par value; 100,000,000 shares authorized; none issued

   or outstanding as of September 30, 2017 and December 31, 2016, respectively

 

-

 

 

 

-

 

Common stock; $0.0001 par value; 125,000,000 shares authorized; 38,700,693 and

   35,024,002 shares issued and outstanding as of September 30, 2017 and

   December 31, 2016, respectively

 

3,870

 

 

 

3,502

 

Additional paid-in capital

 

294,717,361

 

 

 

238,836,940

 

Accumulated deficit

 

(164,543,529

)

 

 

(132,858,234

)

Total stockholders’ equity

 

130,177,702

 

 

 

105,982,208

 

Total liabilities and stockholders’ equity

$

193,507,216

 

 

$

132,942,889

 

 

See accompanying notes to condensed consolidated financial statements

 

 

 

4


 

MINERVA NEUROSCIENCES, INC.

Condensed Consolidated Statements of Operations

(Unaudited)

 

 

Three Months Ended

September 30,

 

 

Nine Months Ended

September 30,

 

 

2017

 

 

2016

 

 

2017

 

 

2016

 

Expenses

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Research and development

$

8,956,468

 

 

$

5,852,121

 

 

$

23,714,932

 

 

$

13,941,283

 

General and administrative

 

2,450,588

 

 

 

2,379,809

 

 

 

7,922,738

 

 

 

7,012,057

 

Total expenses

 

11,407,056

 

 

 

8,231,930

 

 

 

31,637,670

 

 

 

20,953,340

 

Loss from operations

 

(11,407,056

)

 

 

(8,231,930

)

 

 

(31,637,670

)

 

 

(20,953,340

)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Foreign exchange losses

 

(9,417

)

 

 

(2,578

)

 

 

(46,215

)

 

 

(27,552

)

Investment income

 

293,797

 

 

 

69,983

 

 

 

508,116

 

 

 

136,960

 

Interest expense

 

(137,899

)

 

 

(258,764

)

 

 

(509,526

)

 

 

(797,376

)

Net loss

$

(11,260,575

)

 

$

(8,423,289

)

 

$

(31,685,295

)

 

$

(21,641,308

)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Net loss per share, basic and diluted

$

(0.28

)

 

$

(0.24

)

 

$

(0.84

)

 

$

(0.71

)

Weighted average shares outstanding, basic and diluted

 

40,880,359

 

 

 

34,806,263

 

 

 

37,676,686

 

 

 

30,393,293

 

 

See accompanying notes to condensed consolidated financial statements

 

 

 

5


 

MINERVA NEUROSCIENCES, INC.

Condensed Consolidated Statement of Changes in Stockholders’ Equity

(Unaudited)

 

 

Common Stock

 

 

Additional

 

 

Accumulated

 

 

 

 

 

 

Shares

 

 

Amount

 

 

Paid-In Capital

 

 

Deficit

 

 

Total

 

Balances at January 1, 2016

 

24,721,143

 

 

$

2,472

 

 

$

157,129,947

 

 

$

(101,812,862

)

 

$

55,319,557

 

Exercise of common stock warrants

 

3,850,051

 

 

 

385

 

 

 

22,222,109

 

 

 

-

 

 

 

22,222,494

 

Exercise of stock options

 

1,900

 

 

 

-

 

 

 

9,861

 

 

 

-

 

 

 

9,861

 

Issuance of common stock in a public offering, net of

   issuance costs of $3,832,004

 

6,052,631

 

 

 

606

 

 

 

53,667,385

 

 

 

-

 

 

 

53,667,991

 

Issuance of common stock pursuant to a private

   placement

 

181,488

 

 

 

18

 

 

 

999,981

 

 

 

-

 

 

 

999,999

 

Stock-based compensation

 

-

 

 

 

-

 

 

 

2,558,456

 

 

 

-

 

 

 

2,558,456

 

Net loss

 

-

 

 

 

-

 

 

 

-

 

 

 

(21,641,308

)

 

 

(21,641,308

)

Balances at September 30, 2016

 

34,807,213

 

 

$

3,481

 

 

$

236,587,739

 

 

$

(123,454,170

)

 

$

113,137,050

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Balances at January 1, 2017

 

35,024,002

 

 

$

3,502

 

 

$

238,836,940

 

 

$

(132,858,234

)

 

$

105,982,208

 

Exercise of common stock warrants

 

1,621,073

 

 

 

162

 

 

 

9,356,671

 

 

 

-

 

 

 

9,356,833

 

Exercise of stock options

 

197,874

 

 

 

20

 

 

 

1,130,524

 

 

 

-

 

 

 

1,130,544

 

Issuance of common stock in a public offering, net of

   issuance costs of $2,944,168

 

5,750,000

 

 

 

575

 

 

 

41,617,757

 

 

 

-

 

 

 

41,618,332

 

Repurchase of common stock

 

(3,892,256

)

 

 

(389

)

 

 

 

 

 

 

-

 

 

 

(389

)

Stock-based compensation

 

-

 

 

 

-

 

 

 

3,775,469

 

 

 

-

 

 

 

3,775,469

 

Net loss

 

-

 

 

 

-

 

 

 

-

 

 

 

(31,685,295

)

 

 

(31,685,295

)

Balances at September 30, 2017

 

38,700,693

 

 

$

3,870

 

 

$

294,717,361

 

 

$

(164,543,529

)

 

$

130,177,702

 

 

See accompanying notes to condensed consolidated financial statements

 

 

 

6


 

MINERVA NEUROSCIENCES, INC.

Condensed Consolidated Statements of Cash Flows

(Unaudited)

 

 

Nine Months Ended September 30,

 

 

2017

 

 

2016

 

Cash flows from operating activities:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Net loss

$

(31,685,295

)

 

$

(21,641,308

)

Adjustments to reconcile net loss to net cash used in operating activities:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Depreciation and amortization

 

9,310

 

 

 

12,959

 

Amortization of debt discount recorded as interest expense

 

170,822

 

 

 

270,944

 

(Accretion) amortization of marketable securities

 

(83,268

)

 

 

102,632

 

Stock-based compensation expense

 

3,775,469

 

 

 

2,558,456

 

Changes in operating assets and liabilities

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Prepaid expenses and other current assets

 

(51,840

)

 

 

473,537

 

Accounts payable

 

35,071

 

 

 

(527,340

)

Accrued expenses and other current liabilities

 

1,206,592

 

 

 

(1,543,783

)

Accrued collaborative expenses

 

(2,547,952

)

 

 

3,533,788

 

Deferred revenue

 

41,175,600

 

 

 

-

 

Net cash provided by (used in) operating activities

 

12,004,509

 

 

 

(16,760,115

)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Cash flows from investing activities:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Proceeds from the maturity and redemption of marketable securities

 

27,390,000

 

 

 

17,818,000

 

Purchase of marketable securities

 

(134,554,390

)

 

 

-

 

Net cash (used in) provided by investing activities

 

(107,164,390

)

 

 

17,818,000

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Cash flows from financing activities:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Proceeds from sale of common stock in public offering

 

44,562,500

 

 

 

57,499,995

 

Costs paid in connection with public offering

 

(2,944,168

)

 

 

(3,832,004

)

Repurchase of common stock

 

(389

)

 

 

-

 

Proceeds from exercise of common stock warrants

 

9,356,833

 

 

 

22,222,494

 

Proceeds from exercise of stock options

 

1,130,544

 

 

 

9,861

 

Repayments of notes payable

 

(3,671,300

)

 

 

(389,203

)

Proceeds from sale of common stock in private placement

 

-

 

 

 

999,999

 

Net cash provided by financing activities

 

48,434,020

 

 

 

76,511,142

 

Net (decrease) increase in cash and cash equivalents

 

(46,725,861

)

 

 

77,569,027

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Cash and cash equivalents

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Beginning of period

 

82,980,609

 

 

 

14,284,054

 

End of period

$

36,254,748

 

 

$

91,853,081

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Supplemental disclosure of cash flow information

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Cash paid for interest

$

360,272

 

 

$

528,750

 

 

See accompanying notes to condensed consolidated financial statements

 

 

 

7


 

MINERVA NEUROSCIENCES, INC.

Notes to Condensed Consolidated Financial Statements

As of September 30, 2017 and for the Nine Months Ended September 30, 2017 and 2016

(Unaudited)

 

NOTE 1 — NATURE OF OPERATIONS AND LIQUIDITY

Nature of Operations

Minerva Neurosciences, Inc. (“Minerva” or the “Company”) is a clinical-stage biopharmaceutical company focused on the development and commercialization of a portfolio of product candidates to treat patients suffering from central nervous system (“CNS”) diseases. The Company has acquired or in-licensed four development-stage proprietary compounds that it believes have innovative mechanisms of action and therapeutic profiles that may potentially address the unmet needs of patients with these diseases. The Company’s lead product candidate is MIN-101, a compound the Company is developing for the treatment of schizophrenia. In addition, the Company’s portfolio includes seltorexant (MIN-202, also known as JNJ-42847922), a compound the Company is co-developing with Janssen Pharmaceutica NV (“Janssen”), for the treatment of insomnia disorder and major depressive disorder (“MDD”); MIN-117, a compound the Company is developing for the treatment of MDD; and MIN-301, a compound the Company is developing for the treatment of Parkinson’s disease.

In November 2013, the Company merged with Sonkei Pharmaceuticals Inc. (“Sonkei”), a clinical-stage biopharmaceutical company and, in February 2014, the Company acquired Mind-NRG, a pre-clinical-stage biopharmaceutical company. The Company refers to these transactions as the Sonkei Merger and Mind-NRG Acquisition, respectively. The Company holds licenses to MIN-101 and MIN-117 from Mitsubishi Tanabe Pharma Corporation (“MTPC”) with the rights to develop, sell and import MIN-101 and MIN-117 globally, excluding most of Asia. With the acquisition of Mind-NRG, the Company obtained exclusive rights to develop and commercialize MIN-301. The Company has also entered into a co-development and license agreement with Janssen, for the exclusive right to commercialize, and the co-exclusive right (with Janssen and its affiliates) to use and develop, seltorexant in the European Union, Switzerland, Liechtenstein, Iceland and Norway (the “Minerva Territory”), subject to certain royalty payments to Janssen, and royalty rights for any sales outside the Minerva Territory.

Liquidity

The accompanying financial statements have been prepared as though the Company will continue as a going concern, which contemplates the realization of assets and satisfaction of liabilities in the normal course of business. The Company has limited capital resources and has incurred recurring operating losses and negative cash flows from operations since inception. As of September 30, 2017, the Company has an accumulated deficit of approximately $164.5 million and net cash provided by operating activities was approximately $12.0 million during the nine months ended September 30, 2017. Management expects to incur operating losses and negative cash flows from operations in the future. The Company has financed its operations to date from proceeds from the sale of common stock, warrants, loans and convertible promissory notes.

 

The Company believes that its existing cash, cash equivalents and marketable securities (current and non-current) will be sufficient to meet its cash commitments for at least the next 12 months after the date that the interim condensed financial statements are issued. The process of drug development can be costly and the timing and outcomes of clinical trials is uncertain. The assumptions upon which the Company has based its estimates are routinely evaluated and may be subject to change. The actual amount of the Company’s expenditures will vary depending upon a number of factors including but not limited to the design, timing and duration of future clinical trials, the progress of the Company’s research and development programs and the level of financial resources available. The Company has the ability to adjust its operating plan spending levels based on the timing of future clinical trials which will be predicated upon adequate funding to complete the trials.

The Company will need to raise additional capital in order to continue to fund operations and fully fund later stage clinical development programs. The Company believes that it will be able to obtain additional working capital through equity financings or other arrangements to fund future operations; however, there can be no assurance that such additional financing, if available, can be obtained on terms acceptable to the Company.  If the Company is unable to obtain such additional financing, future operations would need to be scaled back or discontinued.

 

8


 

NOTE 2 — SIGNIFICANT ACCOUNTING POLICIES

Basis of presentation

The interim condensed consolidated financial statements have been prepared in accordance with accounting principles generally accepted in the United States of America (“GAAP”) for interim reporting and the requirements of the Securities and Exchange Commission (“SEC”) in accordance with Regulation S-X, Rule 10-01. Under those rules, certain notes and financial information that are normally required for annual financial statements can be condensed or omitted. In the opinion of the Company’s management, the accompanying financial statements contain all adjustments (consisting of items of a normal and recurring nature) necessary to present fairly the financial position as of September 30, 2017, the results of operations for the three and nine months ended September 30, 2017 and 2016 and cash flows for the nine months ended September 30, 2017 and 2016. The results of operations for the three and nine months ended September 30, 2017, are not necessarily indicative of the results to be expected for the full year. When preparing financial statements in conformity with GAAP, management must make estimates and assumptions that affect the reported amounts of assets and liabilities, disclosure of contingent assets and liabilities at the date of the financial statements and the reported amounts of expenses during the reporting period. Actual results could differ from those estimates. The consolidated balance sheet as of December 31, 2016 was derived from the audited annual financial statements. The accompanying unaudited condensed consolidated financial statements and notes thereto should be read in conjunction with the audited consolidated financial statements for the year ended December 31, 2016 included in the Company’s Annual Report on Form 10-K filed with the SEC on March 13, 2017.

Consolidation

The accompanying consolidated financial statements include the results of the Company and its wholly-owned subsidiaries, Mind-NRG Sarl and Minerva Neurosciences Securities Corporation.  Intercompany transactions have been eliminated.

Significant risks and uncertainties

The Company’s operations are subject to a number of factors that can affect its operating results and financial condition. Such factors include, but are not limited to: the results of clinical testing and trial activities of the Company’s products, the Company’s ability to obtain regulatory approval to market its products, competition from products manufactured and sold or being developed by other companies, the price of, and demand for, Company products, the Company’s ability to negotiate favorable licensing or other manufacturing and marketing agreements for its products, and the Company’s ability to raise capital.

The Company currently has no commercially approved products and there can be no assurance that the Company’s research and development will be successfully commercialized. Developing and commercializing a product requires significant time and capital and is subject to regulatory review and approval as well as competition from other biotechnology and pharmaceutical companies. The Company operates in an environment of rapid change and is dependent upon the continued services of its employees and consultants and obtaining and protecting intellectual property.

Use of estimates

The preparation of financial statements in conformity with GAAP requires management to make estimates and assumptions that affect the reported amounts of assets and liabilities and disclosures of contingent assets and liabilities at the date of the financial statements and the reported amounts of expenses during the reporting period. Actual results could differ from those estimates.

Cash and cash equivalents

Cash equivalents include short-term, highly-liquid instruments, consisting of money market accounts and short-term investments with maturities from the date of purchase of 90 days or less. The majority of cash and cash equivalents are maintained with major financial institutions in North America. Deposits with these financial institutions may exceed the amount of insurance provided on such deposits; however, these deposits may be redeemed upon demand and, therefore, bear minimal risk.

Restricted cash

Cash accounts with any type of restriction are classified as restricted. The Company maintained restricted cash balances as collateral for corporate credit cards in the amount of $80,000 at September 30, 2017 and December 31, 2016.

9


 

Marketable securities

Marketable securities consists of corporate debt securities maturing in sixteen months or less. Based on the Company’s intentions regarding its marketable securities, all marketable securities are classified as held-to-maturity and are carried under the amortized cost approach. The Company’s investments in marketable securities are classified as Level 2 within the fair value hierarchy. As of September 30, 2017, remaining final maturities of marketable securities ranged from January 2018 to February 2019, with a weighted average remaining maturity of approximately 8 months. The following table provides the amortized cost basis, aggregate fair value, net unrealized (gains)/losses and the net carrying value of investments in held-to-maturity securities as of September 30, 2017:  

 

 

September 30, 2017

 

 

Amortized

 

 

Aggregate

 

 

Unrealized

 

 

Unrealized

 

 

Net Carrying

 

 

Cost

 

 

Fair Value

 

 

Gains

 

 

Losses

 

 

Value

 

Marketable securities:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Corporate bonds - current

$

96,675,088

 

 

$

96,654,738

 

 

$

(726

)

 

$

21,075

 

 

$

96,675,088

 

Corporate bonds - noncurrent

 

10,355,092

 

 

 

10,337,216

 

 

 

-

 

 

 

17,876

 

 

 

10,355,092

 

Marketable securities:

$

107,030,180

 

 

$

106,991,954

 

 

$

(726

)

 

$

38,951

 

 

$

107,030,180

 

 

Research and development costs

Costs incurred in connection with research and development activities are expensed as incurred. These costs include licensing fees to use certain technology in the Company’s research and development projects as well as fees paid to consultants and various entities that perform certain research and testing on behalf of the Company and costs related to salaries, benefits, bonuses and stock-based compensation granted to employees in research and development functions. The Company determines expenses related to clinical studies based on estimates of the services received and efforts expended pursuant to contracts with multiple research institutions and contract research organizations that conduct and manage clinical studies on its behalf. The financial terms of these agreements are subject to negotiation, vary from contract to contract and may result in uneven payment flows. Payments under some of these contracts depend on factors such as the successful enrollment of patients and the completion of clinical trial milestones. In accruing service fees, the Company estimates the time period over which services will be performed and the level of effort to be expended in each period. If the actual timing of the performance of services or the level of effort varies from the estimate, the accrual is adjusted accordingly. The expenses for some trials may be recognized on a straight-line basis if the expected costs are expected to be incurred ratably during the period. Payments for these activities are based on the terms of the individual arrangements, which may differ from the pattern of costs incurred, and are reflected in the consolidated financial statements as prepaid or accrued expenses.

In February 2014, the Company entered into a Co-Development and License Agreement. The Company accounts for the Co-Development and License Agreement as a joint risk-sharing collaboration in accordance with ASC 808, Collaboration Arrangements. Costs between the Company and the licensor with respect to each party’s share of development costs that have been incurred pursuant to the joint development plan are recorded within research and development expenses or general and administrative expenses, as applicable, in the accompanying consolidated financial statements due to the joint risk-sharing nature of the activities. During the three months ended September 30, 2017 and 2016, the Company recorded an expense of $4.5 million and $3.5 million, respectively, for certain development activities in accordance with the terms of the Co-Development and License Agreement. During the nine months ended September 30, 2017 and 2016, the Company recorded an expense of $11.2 million and $3.5 million, respectively, for certain development activities in accordance with the terms of the co-development agreement.

In June 2017, the Company entered into an agreement with Janssen to amend its Co-Development and License Agreement for seltorexant (the “Amendment”).  The effectiveness of this agreement was contingent upon approval of its terms by the European Commission and the closing of the acquisition of Actelion by affiliates of Janssen.  These conditions were subsequently met, and the Amendment became effective on August 29, 2017. Janssen made an upfront payment to the Company of $30 million upon the effectiveness of the Amendment and agreed to make a $20 million payment at the start of a Phase 3 insomnia trial for seltorexant and a $20 million payment when 50% of the patients are enrolled in this trial. Janssen further agreed to waive the remaining payments due from the Company until completion of the Phase 2 development of seltorexant. The $30 million payment and $11.2 million in previously accrued collaborative expenses, which were forgiven upon the effective date of the agreement, will be earned and recognized as revenue as the services are performed from the commencement of Phase 3 development to the completion of the development activities using the proportional performance method. The $41.2 million was recorded as deferred revenue as of September 30, 2017.

In-process research and development

In-process research and development (“IPR&D”) assets represent capitalized incomplete research projects that the Company acquired through business combinations. Such assets are initially measured at their acquisition date fair values. The initial fair value of the

10


 

research projects are recorded as intangible assets on the balance sheet, rather than expensed, regardless of whether these assets have an alternative future use.

The amounts capitalized are being accounted for as indefinite-lived intangible assets, subject to impairment testing, until completion or abandonment of research and development efforts associated with the project. An IPR&D asset is considered abandoned when it ceases to be used (that is, research and development efforts associated with the asset have ceased, and there are no plans to sell or license the asset or derive defensive value from the asset). At that point, the asset is considered to be disposed of and is written off. Upon successful completion of each project, the Company will make a determination about the then remaining useful life of the intangible asset and begin amortization. The Company tests its indefinite-lived intangibles, IPR&D assets, for impairment annually on November 30 and more frequently if events or changes in circumstances indicate that it is more likely than not that the asset is impaired. When testing indefinite-lived intangibles for impairment, the Company may assess qualitative factors for its indefinite-lived intangibles to determine whether it is more likely than not (that is, a likelihood of more than 50 percent) that the asset is impaired. Alternatively, the Company may bypass this qualitative assessment for some or all of its indefinite-lived intangibles and perform the quantitative impairment test that compares the fair value of the indefinite- lived intangible asset with the asset’s carrying amount. There was no impairment of IPR&D for the three and nine months ended September 30, 2017 or 2016.

Stock-based compensation

The Company recognizes compensation cost relating to stock-based payment transactions using a fair-value measurement method, which requires all stock-based payments to employees, including grants of employee stock options, to be recognized in operating results as compensation expense based on fair value over the requisite service period of the awards. The Company determines the fair value of stock-based awards using the Black-Scholes option-pricing model which uses both historical and current market data to estimate fair value. The method incorporates various assumptions such as the risk-free interest rate, expected volatility, expected dividend yield, expected forfeiture rate and expected life of the options. The fair value of restricted stock units (“RSUs”) is equal to the closing price of the Company’s common stock on the date of grant.

The date of expense recognition for grants to non-employees is the earlier of the date at which a commitment for performance by the counterparty to earn the equity instrument is reached or the date at which the counterparty’s performance is complete. The Company determines the fair value of stock-based awards granted to non-employees similar to the way fair value of awards are determined for employees except that certain assumptions used in the Black-Scholes option-pricing model, such as expected life of the option, may be different and the fair value of each unvested award is adjusted at the end of each period for any change in fair value from the previous valuation until the award vests.

Foreign currency transactions

The Company’s functional currency is the US dollar. The Company pays certain vendor invoices in the respective foreign currency. The Company records an expense in US dollars at the time the liability is incurred. Changes in the applicable foreign currency rate between the date an expense is recorded and the payment date is recorded as a foreign currency gain or loss.

Loss per share

Basic loss per share excludes dilution and is computed by dividing net loss by the weighted-average number of shares of common stock outstanding for the period. Diluted loss per share reflects the potential dilution that could occur if securities or other contracts to issue common stock were exercised or converted into common stock or resulted in the issuance of common stock that shared in the earnings of the entity. The Company had a net loss in all periods presented, thus the inclusion of stock options and warrants would be anti-dilutive to net loss per share.

Concentration of credit risk

Financial instruments that potentially subject the Company to concentrations of credit risk are primarily cash, cash equivalents and marketable securities (current and non-current). The Company maintains its cash and cash equivalent balances in the form of business checking accounts and money market accounts, the balances of which, at times, may exceed federally insured limits. Exposure to cash and cash equivalents credit risk is reduced by placing such deposits with major financial institutions and monitoring their credit ratings. Marketable securities consist primarily of corporate bonds, with fixed interest rates. Exposure to credit risk of marketable securities is reduced by maintaining a diverse portfolio and monitoring their credit ratings.

11


 

Long-lived assets

The Company reviews the recoverability of all long-lived assets, including the related useful lives, whenever events or changes in circumstances indicate that the carrying amount of a long-lived asset might not be recoverable. If required, the Company compares the estimated undiscounted future net cash flows to the related asset’s carrying value to determine whether there has been an impairment. If an asset is considered impaired, the asset is written down to fair value, which is based either on discounted cash flows or appraised values in the period the impairment becomes known. The Company believes that all long-lived assets are recoverable, and no impairment was deemed necessary at September 30, 2017 and 2016.

Goodwill

The Company tests its goodwill for impairment annually, or whenever events or changes in circumstances indicate an impairment may have occurred, by comparing its reporting unit’s carrying value to its fair value. Impairment may result from, among other things, deterioration in the performance of the acquired business, adverse market conditions, adverse changes in applicable laws or regulations and a variety of other circumstances. If the Company determines that an impairment has occurred, it is required to record a write-down of the carrying value and charge the impairment as an operating expense in the period the determination is made. In evaluating the recoverability of the carrying value of goodwill, the Company must make assumptions regarding estimated future cash flows and other factors to determine the fair value of the acquired assets. Changes in strategy or market conditions could significantly impact those judgments in the future and require an adjustment to the recorded balances. The Company tests its goodwill for impairment as of November 30. There was no impairment of goodwill for the nine months ended September 30, 2017 and 2016.

Revenue recognition

The Company applies the revenue recognition guidance in accordance with Financial Accounting Standards Board (FASB) Accounting Standards Codification (ASC) Subtopic 605, Revenue Recognition. Revenue is recognized when persuasive evidence of an arrangement exists, delivery has occurred and title has passed, the price is fixed or determinable, and collectability is reasonably assured. The Company is a development stage company and has had no revenues from product sales to date.

In June 2017, the Company entered into the Amendment.  The effectiveness of the Amendment was contingent upon approval of its terms by the European Commission and the closing of the acquisition of Actelion by affiliates of Janssen.  These conditions were subsequently met, and the agreement became effective on August 29, 2017. Janssen made an upfront payment to the Company of $30 million upon the effectiveness of the Amendment and agreed to make a $20 million payment at the start of a Phase 3 insomnia trial for seltorexant and a $20 million payment when 50% of the patients are enrolled in this trial. Janssen further agreed to waive the remaining payments due from the Company until completion of the Phase 2 development of seltorexant. The $30 million payment and $11.2 million in previously accrued collaborative expenses, which were forgiven upon the effective date of the agreement, will be earned and recognized as revenue as the services are performed from the commencement of Phase 3 development to the completion of the development activities using the proportional performance method. The $41.2 million was recorded as deferred revenue as of September 30, 2017.

Deferred revenue

The Company applies the revenue recognition guidance in accordance with Financial Accounting Standards Board (FASB) Accounting Standards Codification (ASC) Subtopic 605, Revenue Recognition. Using FASB ASC Subtopic 605, Revenue that is unearned is deferred. Deferred revenue expected to be recognized as revenue more than one year subsequent to the balance sheet date is classified as long-term deferred revenue.

Segment information

Operating segments are defined as components of an enterprise (business activity from which it earns revenue and incurs expenses) about which discrete financial information is available and regularly reviewed by the chief operating decision maker in deciding how to allocate resources and in assessing performance. The Company’s chief decision maker, who is the Chief Executive Officer, reviews operating results to make decisions about allocating resources and assessing performance for the entire Company. The Company views its operations and manages its business as one operating segment.

Comprehensive loss

The Company had no items of comprehensive loss other than its net loss for each period presented.

12


 

Recent accounting pronouncements

From time to time, new accounting pronouncements are issued by the Financial Accounting Standards Board (“FASB”) and are adopted by the Company as of the specified effective date.

Recently Adopted Accounting Pronouncements

In March 2016, the FASB issued Accounting Standards Update (“ASU”) No 2016-09, Compensation – Stock Compensation (Topic 718). The new standard simplifies several aspects of the accounting for employee share-based payment transactions, including the accounting for income taxes, forfeitures, and statutory tax withholding requirements, as well as classification in the statement of cash flows. Under this guidance, a company recognizes all excess tax benefits and tax deficiencies as income tax expense or benefit in the statement of operations. This change eliminates the notion of the additional paid-in capital pool and reduces the complexity in accounting for excess tax benefits and tax deficiencies. The new standard is effective for public companies for annual reporting periods beginning after December 15, 2016, including interim periods within those annual reporting periods; however, early adoption is allowed. The Company adopted the new standard on January 1, 2017. The adoption of this standard did not have a material impact on the Company’s consolidated financial statements.

Accounting Pronouncements Not Yet Adopted

In May 2014, the FASB issued ASU No. 2014-09, Revenue from Contracts with Customers (Topic 606) (“ASU 2014-09”). Subsequently, the FASB also issued ASU 2015-14,  Revenue from Contracts with Customers (Topic 606) , which adjusted the effective date of ASU 2014-09; ASU No. 2016-08,  Revenue from Contracts with Customers (Topic 606): Principal versus Agent Considerations (Reporting Revenue Gross versus Net) , which amends the principal-versus-agent implementation guidance and illustrations in ASU 2014-09; ASU No. 2016-10,  Revenue from Contracts with Customers (Topic 606): Identifying Performance Obligations and Licensing , which clarifies identifying performance obligation and licensing implementation guidance and illustrations in ASU 2014-09; and ASU No. 2016-12,  Revenue from Contracts with Customers (Topic 606): Narrow-Scope Improvements and Practical Expedients , which addresses implementation issues and is intended to reduce the cost and complexity of applying the new revenue standard in ASU 2014-09 (collectively, the “Revenue ASUs”).

The Revenue ASUs provide an accounting standard for a single comprehensive model for use in accounting for revenue arising from contracts with customers and supersedes most current revenue recognition guidance. The accounting standard is effective for interim and annual periods beginning after December 15, 2017, with an option to early adopt for interim and annual periods beginning after December 15, 2016. The guidance permits two methods of adoption: retrospectively to each prior reporting period presented (the full retrospective method), or retrospectively with the cumulative effect of initially applying the guidance recognized at the date of initial application (the modified retrospective method). The Company is currently evaluating the impact of the pending adoption of the new standard on the Company’s consolidated financial statements.

In February 2016, the FASB issued ASU No. 2016-02, Leases. The new standard establishes a right-of-use (ROU) model that requires a lessee to record a ROU asset and a lease liability on the balance sheet for all leases with terms longer than 12 months. Leases will be classified as either finance or operating, with classification affecting the pattern of expense recognition in the income statement. The new standard is effective for fiscal years beginning after December 15, 2018, including interim periods within those fiscal years. A modified retrospective transition approach is required for lessees for capital and operating leases existing at, or entered into after, the beginning of the earliest comparative period presented in the financial statements, with certain practical expedients available. Refer to Note 9, Commitments and Contingencies, for the Company's current lease commitments. The Company is currently evaluating the impact of the pending adoption of the new standard on the Company’s consolidated financial statements.

In August 2016, the FASB issued ASU No 2016-15, Statement of Cash Flows – Classification of Certain Cash Receipts and Cash Payments (Topic 230). The new standard clarifies the treatment of several cash flow categories. In addition, ASU 2016-15 clarifies that when cash receipts and cash payments have aspects of more than one class of cash flows and cannot be separated, classification will depend on the predominant source or use. This update is effective for annual periods beginning after December 15, 2017, and interim periods within those fiscal years, with early adoption permitted, including adoption in an interim period.  The Company is currently evaluating the impact of the pending adoption of the new standard on the Company’s consolidated financial statements.

In January 2017, the FASB issued ASU No 2017-4, Intangibles — Goodwill and Other (Topic 350). The new standard simplifies the Test for Goodwill Impairment. This update is effective for annual periods beginning after December 15, 2019, and interim periods within those fiscal years, with early adoption permitted, including adoption in an interim period. The Company is currently evaluating the impact of the pending adoption of the new standard on the Company’s consolidated financial statements.

13


 

In March 2017, the FASB issued ASU No 2017-8, Receivables—Nonrefundable Fees and Other Costs (Subtopic 310-20) Premium Amortization on Purchased Callable Debt Securities. The new standard is intended to enhance the accounting for the amortization of premiums for purchased callable debt securities. This update is effective for annual periods beginning after December 15, 2018, and interim periods within those fiscal years, with early adoption permitted, including adoption in an interim period. The Company is currently evaluating the impact of the pending adoption of the new standard on the Company’s consolidated financial statements.

 

NOTE 3 — ACCRUED EXPENSES

Accrued expenses and other liabilities consist of the following:  

 

 

September 30,

2017

 

 

December 31,

2016

 

Research and development costs and other accrued expenses

$

859,901

 

 

$

574,290

 

Accrued bonus

 

761,971

 

 

 

-

 

Professional fees

 

334,752

 

 

 

192,000

 

Vacation payable

 

37,827

 

 

 

-

 

Interest payable

 

27,954

 

 

 

49,523

 

 

$

2,022,405

 

 

$

815,813

 

 

 

NOTE 4 — NET LOSS PER SHARE OF COMMON STOCK

Diluted loss per share is the same as basic loss per share for all periods presented as the effects of potentially dilutive issuances were anti-dilutive given the Company’s net loss. Basic loss per share is computed by dividing net loss by the weighted-average number of common shares outstanding. The following table sets forth the computation of basic and diluted loss per share for common stockholders:

 

 

Three Months Ended

 

 

Nine Months Ended

 

 

September 30,

 

 

September 30,

 

 

2017

 

 

2016

 

 

2017

 

 

2016

 

Net loss

$

(11,260,575

)

 

$

(8,423,289

)

 

$

(31,685,295

)

 

$

(21,641,308

)

Weighted average shares of

   common stock outstanding

 

40,880,359

 

 

 

34,806,263

 

 

 

37,676,686

 

 

 

30,393,293

 

Net loss per share of common

   stock – basic and diluted

$

(0.28

)

 

$

(0.24

)

 

$

(0.84

)

 

$

(0.71

)

 

The following securities outstanding at September 30, 2017 and 2016 have been excluded from the calculation of weighted average shares outstanding as their effect on the calculation of loss per share is antidilutive:

 

 

September 30,

 

 

2017

 

 

2016

 

Common stock options

 

3,997,650

 

 

 

3,569,298

 

Restricted stock units

 

194,600

 

 

-

 

Common stock warrants

 

40,790

 

 

 

2,472,400

 

 

 

NOTE 5 — DEBT

Loan and Security Agreement

On January 16, 2015, the Company entered into a Loan and Security Agreement (as amended, the “Loan Agreement”) with Oxford Finance LLC (“Oxford”) and Silicon Valley Bank (“SVB” and, together with Oxford, the “Lenders”), providing for term loans to the Company in an aggregate principal amount of up to $15 million, in two tranches (the “Term Loans”).

The Company drew down the initial Term Loans in the aggregate principal amount of $10 million (the “Term A Loans”), on January 16, 2015. The Term A Loans bear interest at a fixed rate of 7.05% per annum. The Company believes that the Company's debt obligations accrue interest at rates which approximate prevailing market rates for instruments with similar characteristics and, accordingly, the carrying values for these instruments approximate fair value.

14


 

In August 2015, the Lenders and the Company entered into a First Amendment to the Loan Agreement, amending certain milestones related to the six month extension of the interest-only repayment period of the Term A Loans.  By raising at least $30.0 million in gross capital (including at least $20.0 million from the sale of equity securities) and completing the first dosing of its Phase 1/2 clinical trial for MIN-117 prior to December 31, 2015, the Company achieved the interest-only milestones under the Loan Agreement and elected to extend the interest-only period an additional six months and reduce the repayment term by six months. Through August 1, 2016, the Company was obligated only to make monthly interest payments on the outstanding principal balance on the Term A Loans, followed by 24 months of equal principal and interest payments.

On or prior to March 31, 2016, the Company was permitted to borrow additional term loans in the aggregate principal amount up to $5 million, subject to the satisfaction of certain borrowing conditions, including the Company’s achievement of primary endpoints on its Phase 2a trials for MIN-117 and seltrorexant programs. In June 2016, the Company irrevocably elected not to borrow the additional $5 million available under the Term Loans.

The Company paid a facility fee at the time of borrowing of $75,000 for access to the Term Loans and will be required to pay a final payment of 5.1% of the total amount borrowed, which has been included as a component of the debt discount and is amortized to interest expense over the term of the loans.  The outstanding Term A Loans and debt discount are as follows:

 

 

 

September 30, 2017

 

Term A Loans

 

$

4,758,116

 

Less: debt discount and financing costs

 

 

(30,235

)

Less: current portion

 

 

(5,194,337

)

Accrued portion of final payment

 

 

466,456

 

Long-term portion

 

$

-

 

 

For the three months ended September 30, 2017 and 2016, the Company recognized interest expense of $0.1 million and $0.3 million respectively, including $0.1 million in both periods, related to the debt discount. For the nine months ended September 30, 2017 and 2016, the Company recognized interest expense of $0.5 million and $0.8 million respectively, including $0.2 million and $0.3 million, respectively, related to the debt discount.    

The Term Loans mature on August 1, 2018. The Company may prepay all, but not less than all, of the loaned amount upon 30 days’ advance notice to the Lenders, provided that the Company will be obligated to pay a prepayment fee equal to (i) 3% of the outstanding balance, if the loan is prepaid within 24 months of the funding date, (ii) 2% of the outstanding balance, if the loan is prepaid between 24 and 36 months of the funding date and (iii) 1% of the outstanding balance, if the loan is prepaid thereafter (each, a “Prepayment Fee”).  The expected remaining repayment of the $10.0 million Term A loan principal is as follows:

 

2017

 

 

1,267,412

 

2018

 

 

3,490,704

 

Total Term A Loans

 

$

4,758,116

 

 

The Company’s obligations under the Loan Agreement are secured by a first priority security interest in substantially all of its assets, other than its intellectual property. The Company has also agreed not to pledge or otherwise encumber its intellectual property assets, except that it may grant certain exclusive and non-exclusive licenses of its intellectual property as set forth in the Loan Agreement. In addition, the Company pledged all of its equity interests in Minerva Neurosciences Securities Corporation and 65% of its equity interests in Mind-NRG, Sarl as security for its obligations under the Loan Agreement.

Upon the occurrence of certain events, including but not limited to the Company’s failure to satisfy its payment obligations under the Loan Agreement, the breach of certain of its other covenants under the Loan Agreement, or the occurrence of a material adverse change, the Lenders will have the right, among other remedies, to declare all principal and interest immediately due and payable, to take control of the Company’s cash in its SVB deposit account, and will have the right to receive the final payment fee and, if the payment of principal and interest is due prior to maturity, the applicable Prepayment Fee. As of September 30, 2017, the Company was in compliance with all covenants set forth in the Loan Agreement.

 

NOTE 6 — CO-DEVELOPMENT AND LICENSE AGREEMENT

On February 13, 2014, the Company signed a co-development and license agreement (“the agreement”) with Janssen, which became effective upon completion of the Company’s initial public offering and the payment of a $22.0 million license fee. Under the agreement, Janssen, the licensor, granted the Company an exclusive license, with the right to sublicense, in the Minerva Territory,

15


 

under (i) certain patent and patent applications to sell products containing any orexin 2 compound, controlled by the licensor and claimed in a licensor patent right as an active ingredient and (ii) seltrorexant for any use in humans. In addition, upon regulatory approval in the Minerva Territory (and earlier if certain default events occur), the Company will have rights to manufacture seltrorexant, also known as JNJ-42847922. The Company has granted to the licensor an exclusive license, with the right to sublicense, under all patent rights and know-how controlled by the Company related to seltrorexant to sell seltrorexant outside the Minerva Territory. In consideration of the licenses granted on July 7, 2014, the Company made a license fee payment of $22.0 million, which was included as a component of research and development expense in 2014.

The original agreement contains certain provisions, which include the Company’s ability to opt-out of the agreement upon completion of certain milestones.  If the Company elects to participate in the development program through to the potential commercial approval of seltorexant, the Company will pay a quarterly royalty percentage to the licensor in the high single digits on aggregate net sales for seltrorexant products sold by the Company, its affiliates and sublicensees in the Minerva Territory. The licensor will pay a quarterly royalty percentage to the Company in the high single digits on aggregate net sales for seltrorexant products sold by the licensor outside the Minerva Territory.  In accordance with the development agreement, the Company will pay 40% of seltrorexant development costs related to the joint development of any seltrorexant products.

The Company’s share of aggregate development costs shall not exceed (i) $5.0 million for the period beginning from the effective date of the license and ending following the completion of certain Phase 1b clinical trials and animal toxicology studies, and (ii) $24.0 million for the period beginning from the effective date of the license and ending following the completion of certain Phase 2 clinical trials.  Janssen has a right to opt out at the end of certain development milestones, after which, Janssen will not have to fund further development of seltrorexant and the Minerva Territory will be expanded to also include all of North America. The Company would then owe Janssen a reduced royalty in the mid-single digits for all sales in the Minerva Territory. Janssen may also terminate the agreement for the Company’s material breach or certain insolvency events, including if the Company is unable to fund its portion of the development costs.

The Company accounts for the co-development and license agreement as a joint risk-sharing collaboration in accordance with ASC 808, Collaboration Arrangements. Payments between the Company and the licensor with respect to each party’s share of seltrorexant development costs that have been incurred pursuant to the joint development plan are recorded within research and development expenses or general and administrative expenses, as applicable, in the accompanying consolidated statements of operations due to the joint risk-sharing nature of the activities. The Company has included zero million and $2.5 million in accrued collaborative expenses, as of September 30, 2017 and December 31, 2016, respectively, related to this agreement. In the nine months ended September 30, 2017 and 2016, the Company paid $2.5 million and zero, respectively, related to development activities under this agreement.

On July 6, 2016, the Company and Janssen agreed that “Decision Point 2” had been reached as defined under the co-development agreement. As neither party has exercised their right to withdraw from the agreement, the Company has paid Janssen $3.5 million and have incurred direct expenses of $0.3 million related to development activities under the current phase of development. During the three months ended September 30, 2017 and 2016, the Company recorded an expense of $4.5 million and $3.5 million, respectively, for certain development activities in accordance with the terms of the co-development agreement. During the nine months ended September 30, 2017 and 2016, the Company recorded an expense of $11.2 million and $3.5 million, respectively, for certain development activities in accordance with the terms of the co-development agreement. The company has included zero and $2.5 million in accrued collaborative expenses as of September 30, 2017 and December 31, 2016, respectively, related to this agreement.

16


 

In June 2017, the Company entered into the Amendment.  The effectiveness of the Amendment was contingent upon approval of its terms by the European Commission and the closing of the acquisition of Actelion by affiliates of Janssen.  These conditions were subsequently met, and the agreement became effective on August 29, 2017. Under the amended agreement, Janssen has waived its right to royalties on seltorexant insomnia sales in the European Union, Switzerland, Liechtenstein, Iceland and Norway (the “Minerva Territory”). The Company retains all of its rights to seltorexant, including commercialization of the molecule for the treatment of insomnia and as an as adjunctive therapy for MDD, which include an exclusive license in the Minerva Territory, with royalties payable by the Company to Janssen on seltorexant MDD sales. Royalties on sales outside of the Minerva Territory are payable by Janssen to the Company. Janssen made an upfront payment to the Company of $30 million upon the effectiveness of the Amendment and agreed to make a $20 million payment at the start of a Phase 3 insomnia trial for seltorexant and a $20 million payment when 50% of the patients are enrolled in this trial. Janssen further agreed to waive the remaining payments due from the Company until completion of the Phase 2 development of seltorexant. The $30 million payment and $11.2 million in previously accrued collaborative expenses, which were forgiven upon the effective date of the agreement, will be earned and recognized as revenue as the services are performed from the commencement of Phase 3 development to the completion of the development activities using the proportional performance method. The $30 million payment along with the $11.2 million in previously accrued collaborative expenses have been included under Deferred Revenue on the Company’s balance sheet at September 30, 2017. In connection with the Amendment, the Company repurchased all of the approximately 3.9 million shares of its common stock previously owned by Johnson & Johnson Innovation-JJDC Inc. at a per share price of $0.0001, for an aggregate purchase price of approximately $389.

As a result of the Amendment, the Company assumed strategic control for the clinical development of seltorexant in insomnia under the Phase 2 development program, but has no further financial obligations until the Phase 2b development milestone is complete, which is expected to occur in the second half of 2019. Upon completion of this development milestone, referred to as “Decision Point 4”, Minerva has the right to opt-out of the agreement and collect a royalty on worldwide sales of seltorexant in the single digits with no further obligations to Janssen.  If the Company elects to continue to Phase 3, the Company would be obligated to fund the clinical trials related to insomnia, and receive $40 million in milestone payments from Janssen, and would also be responsible for 40% of Janssen’s development costs in their Phase 3 MDD program.

 

NOTE 7 — STOCKHOLDERS’ EQUITY

Warrant Exercises

In January, February, June and December 2016 and in March 2017, certain investors in the Company’s March 2015 private placement exercised their warrants at an exercise price of $5.772 per share and received an aggregate of 5,673,758 shares of the Company’s common stock. The Company received gross proceeds of approximately $32.7 million from the exercise of these warrants. As of September 30, 2017, there are no remaining warrants outstanding under the Company’s March 2015 private placement.

Public Offering of Common Stock

On July 5, 2017, the Company closed a public offering of its common stock, in which the Company issued and sold 5,750,000 shares of its common stock, including 750,000 shares sold pursuant to the underwriters’ full exercise of their option to purchase additional shares, at a public offering price of $7.75, for aggregate gross proceeds to the Company of $44.6 million. All of the shares issued and sold in this public offering were registered under the Securities Act pursuant to a registration statement on Form S-3 (File No. 333-205764) and a related prospectus and prospectus supplement, in each case filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission. The Company incurred $3.0 million in underwriting discounts and commissions and transaction costs, which will be included as a component of additional paid-in capital, resulting in net proceeds of approximately $41.6 million.

On June 17, 2016, the Company closed a public offering of common stock, in which the Company issued and sold 6,052,631 shares of common stock at a public offering price of $9.50, for aggregate gross proceeds to the Company of $57.5 million. All of the shares issued and sold in this public offering were registered under the Securities Act pursuant to a registration statement on Form S-3 (File No. 333-205764) and a related prospectus and prospectus supplement, in each case filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission. The Company incurred $3.8 million in underwriting discounts and commissions and transaction costs, which have been included as a component of additional paid-in capital, resulting in net proceeds of $53.7 million.

Share Repurchase

In June 2017, the Company entered into an agreement with Janssen to amend its Co-Development and License Agreement for seltorexant. The effectiveness of this agreement was contingent upon approval of its terms by the European Commission and the closing of the acquisition of Actelion by affiliates of Janssen.  These conditions were subsequently met, and the agreement became effective on August 29, 2017. In connection with the Amendment, the Company repurchased all of the approximately 3.9 million

17


 

shares of its common stock previously owned by Johnson & Johnson Innovation-JJDC Inc. at a per share price of $0.0001, for an aggregate purchase price of approximately $389.  

Private Placement of Common Stock

On March 17, 2016, the Company entered into a common stock purchase agreement with a member of the Board of Directors, pursuant to which the Company, in a private placement, sold to the director an aggregate of 181,488 shares of the Company’s common stock, at a price per share of $5.51, for gross proceeds of approximately $1.0 million.

Term Loan Warrants

In connection with the Loan Agreement, the Company issued the Lenders warrants to purchase shares of its common stock upon its draw of each tranche of the Term Loans. The aggregate number of shares of common stock issuable upon exercise of the warrants is equal to 2.25% of the amount drawn of such tranche, divided by the average closing price per share of the Company’s common stock reported on the NASDAQ Global Market for the 10 consecutive trading days prior to the applicable draw.  Upon the draw of the Term A Loans, the Company issued the Lenders warrants to purchase 40,790 shares of common stock at a per share exercise price of $5.516. The warrants are immediately exercisable upon issuance, and other than in connection with certain mergers or acquisitions, will expire on the ten-year anniversary of the date of issuance.  The fair value of the warrants was estimated at $0.2 million using a Black-Scholes model and assuming: (i) expected volatility of 100.8%, (ii) risk free interest rate of 1.83%, (iii) an expected life of 10 years and (iv) no dividend payments.  The fair value of the warrants was included as a discount to the Term A Loans and also as a component of additional paid-in capital and will be amortized to interest expense over the term of the loan. All such warrants were outstanding as of September 30, 2017.  

 

NOTE 8 — STOCK OPTION PLAN AND STOCK-BASED COMPENSATION

In December 2013, the Company adopted the 2013 Equity Incentive Plan (the “Plan”), which provides for the issuance of options, stock appreciation rights, stock awards and stock units. On January 1, 2017, in accordance with the terms of the Plan, the total shares authorized for issuance under the plan increased by 750,000 to 5,781,333.  This increase represents the lesser of 750,000 shares or 4% of the total shares outstanding calculated as of the end of the most recent fiscal year. The exercise price per share shall not be less than the fair value of the Company’s underlying common stock on the grant date and no option may have a term in excess of ten years. Stock option activity under the Plan is as follows:

 

 

 

Shares Issuable

Pursuant to

Stock Options

 

 

Weighted-

Average

Exercise Price

 

Outstanding January 1, 2017

 

 

3,974,143

 

 

$

6.61

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Granted

 

 

435,000

 

 

$

8.76

 

Exercised

 

 

(197,874

)

 

$

5.71

 

Forfeited

 

 

(213,619

)

 

$

8.09

 

Outstanding September 30, 2017

 

 

3,997,650

 

 

$

6.80

 

Exercisable September 30, 2017

 

 

2,301,624

 

 

$

6.00

 

Available for future grant

 

 

1,375,154

 

 

 

 

 

 

The weighted average grant-date fair value of stock options outstanding on September 30, 2017 was $5.20 per share. Total unrecognized compensation costs related to non-vested stock options at September 30, 2017 was approximately $8.0 million and is expected to be recognized within future operating results over a weighted-average period of 2.6 years. At September 30, 2017, the weighted average contractual term of the options outstanding is approximately 7.8 years. The intrinsic value of outstanding stock options at September 30, 2017 was $6.6 million.

 

18


 

The Company uses the Black Scholes model to estimate the fair value of stock options granted.  For stock options granted during the nine months ended September 30, 2017 and 2016, the Company utilized the following assumptions:

 

 

 

September 30,

 

 

 

2017

 

 

2016

 

Expected term (years)

 

5.5-6.25

 

 

5.5-6.25

 

Risk free interest rate

 

1.83-2.02%

 

 

1.17-1.52%

 

Volatility

 

79-84%

 

 

 

78%

 

Dividend yield

 

 

0%

 

 

 

0%

 

Weighted average grant date fair value per share of

   common stock

 

$

5.08

 

 

$

5.53

 

 

Stock-Based Awards Granted to Non-employees-The Company from time to time grants options to purchase common stock to non-employees for services rendered and records expense ratably over the vesting period of each award. The Company estimates the fair value of the stock options using the Black-Scholes valuation model at each reporting date. The Company granted 155,000 stock options to non-employees during the nine months ended September 30, 2017. The Company recorded stock-based compensation expense for stock options granted to non-employees of $0.2 million and $15,000 during the nine months ended September 30, 2017 and 2016, respectively.

For stock options granted to non-employees, the Company utilized the following assumptions:

 

 

 

September 30,

 

 

 

2017

 

 

2016

 

Expected term (years)

 

8.9-9.5

 

 

9.9

 

Risk free interest rate

 

2.27-2.31%

 

 

 

1.60%

 

Volatility

 

111-112%

 

 

 

101%

 

Dividend yield

 

 

0%

 

 

 

0%

 

Weighted average grant date fair value per share of

   common stock

 

$

6.85

 

 

$

12.76

 

 

The expected term of the employee-related options was estimated using the “simplified” method as defined by the Securities and Exchange Commission’s Staff Accounting Bulletin No. 107, Share-Based Payment. The volatility assumption was determined by examining the historical volatilities for industry peer companies, as the Company did not have sufficient trading history for its common stock. The risk-free interest rate assumption is based on the U.S. Treasury instruments whose term was consistent with the expected term of the options. The dividend assumption is based on the Company’s history and expectation of dividend payouts. The Company has never paid dividends on its common stock and does not anticipate paying dividends on its common stock in the foreseeable future. Accordingly, the Company has assumed no dividend yield for purposes of estimating the fair value of the options.

RSU activity under the Plan for the nine months ended September 30, 2017 is as follows:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Weighted-Average

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Grant Date

 

 

 

RSUs

 

 

Fair Value

 

Unvested January 1, 2017

 

 

219,600

 

 

$

13.45

 

Granted

 

 

-

 

 

$

-

 

Vested

 

 

-

 

 

$

-

 

Forfeited

 

 

(25,000

)

 

$

13.45

 

Unvested September 30, 2017

 

 

194,600

 

 

$

13.45

 

 

RSUs awarded to employees generally vest one-fourth per year over four years from the anniversary of the date of grant, provided the employee remains continuously employed with the Company. Shares of the Company’s stock are delivered to the employee upon vesting, subject to payment of applicable withholding taxes. The fair value of RSUs is equal to the closing price of the Company’s common stock on the date of grant. Total unrecognized compensation costs related to non-vested RSUs at September 30, 2017 was approximately $2.1 million and is expected to be recognized within future operating results over a period of 3.2 years.

The Company recognized stock-based compensation expense for the nine months ended September 30, 2017 and 2016 of $3.8 million and $2.6 million, respectively.  

19


 

 

NOTE 9 — COMMITMENTS AND CONTINGENCIES

In September 2014, the Company entered into a lease agreement for 4,043 square feet of office space in Waltham, MA. The term of the lease was approximately two years, and the Company was required to make monthly rental payments commencing December 2014. Estimated annual rent payable under this operating lease was approximately $0.1 million per year in each of the two years.

In April 2016, the Company entered into an agreement to extend the term of the lease through March 31, 2018. Estimated annual rent payable under this agreement is approximately $0.1 million per year.

From time to time, the Company may be subject to various legal proceedings and claims that arise in the ordinary course of the Company’s business activities. The Company is not aware of any claim or litigation, the outcome of which, if determined adversely to the Company, would have a material effect on the Company’s financial position or results of operations.

 

 

NOTE 10 — RELATED PARTY TRANSACTIONS

In January 2016, the Company entered into a services agreement with V-Watch SA (“V-Watch”), for approximately $105,000 for the use of V-Watch’s SomnoArt device for monitoring sleep in the MIN-101 Phase 2b and MIN-117 Phase 2a trials. The Company’s Chief Executive Officer is the chairman of the board of directors of V-Watch. Funds affiliated with Index Ventures, a stockholder of the Company, hold greater than 10% of the outstanding capital stock of V-Watch. During the nine months ended September 30, 2017 and 2016, the Company recorded an expense of zero and $0.1 million, respectively, related to this agreement.

Also refer to Note 6 – Co-Development and License agreement and Note 7 – Stockholder’s Equity for additional related party transactions.

NOTE 11 — SUBSEQUENT EVENTS

Sublease

On October 2, 2017, the Company entered into an office sublease agreement (the “Sublease”) with Profitect, Inc. (the “Sublandlord”) to sublease approximately 5,923 rentable square feet of office space located at 1601 Trapelo Road, Waltham, MA 02451 (the “Premises”).

The term of the Sublease is scheduled to begin on November 1, 2017 and will expire on July 30, 2021, with a monthly rental rate starting at $14,807.50 and escalating to a maximum monthly rental rate of $16,288.25 in the final 12 months of the term.  The Sublandlord has agreed to provide the Premises to the Company free of charge for the first two months of the term.

 

 

20


 

Item 2.   Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations

You should read the following discussion of our financial condition and results of operations in conjunction with our condensed consolidated financial statements and the notes thereto included elsewhere in this Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q and with our annual audited consolidated financial statements included in our Annual Report on Form 10-K for the year ended December 31, 2016 as filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission on March 13, 2017.

Historical Overview

We are a clinical-stage biopharmaceutical company focused on the development and commercialization of a portfolio of product candidates to treat patients suffering from central nervous system, or CNS, diseases. Leveraging our scientific insights and clinical experience, we have acquired or in-licensed four development-stage proprietary compounds that we believe have innovative mechanisms of action and therapeutic profiles that potentially address the unmet needs of patients with these diseases.

Our product portfolio and potential indications include: MIN-101 for the treatment of schizophrenia, specifically including negative symptoms; seltorexant, or MIN-202 (also known as JNJ-42847922), which we are co-developing with Janssen Pharmaceutica NV, or Janssen, for the treatment of insomnia disorder and major depressive disorder, or MDD; MIN-117 for the treatment of MDD, including anxiety symptoms present in depressed patients; and MIN-301 for the treatment of Parkinson’s disease, and more broadly neurodegenerative disorders. We believe our product candidates have significant potential to improve the lives of a large number of affected patients and their families who are currently not well-served by available therapies.

In November 2013, Cyrenaic Pharmaceuticals, Inc., or Cyrenaic, and Sonkei Pharmaceuticals, Inc., or Sonkei, merged, and the combined company was renamed Minerva Neurosciences, Inc. Cyrenaic had been incorporated in 2007 and had exclusively licensed MIN-101 from Mitsubishi Tanabe Pharma Corporation, or MTPC. Sonkei had been incorporated in 2008 and had exclusively licensed MIN-117 from MTPC. We executed the merger as we saw an opportunity to better serve an underserved patient population through combining a portfolio of promising product candidates targeting CNS diseases. As a result of the merger, we have the rights to develop and commercialize MIN-101 and MIN-117 globally, excluding most of Asia.

We further expanded our product candidate portfolio in February 2014 by acquiring the shares of Mind-NRG SA, or Mind-NRG, which had exclusive rights to develop and commercialize MIN-301. In addition, in February 2014 we entered into a co-development and license agreement with Janssen, one of the Janssen Pharmaceutical Companies of Johnson & Johnson, for the co-development of seltorexant. We entered into an amendment to this agreement in June 2017 that took effect on August 29, 2017. Under the amended agreement, we gained global strategic control of the development of seltorexant to treat insomnia, and Janssen waived its right to royalties on seltorexant insomnia sales in the Minerva territory, which includes the European Union, Switzerland, Liechtenstein, Iceland and Norway (the “Minerva Territory”). We retain our rights to seltorexant as adjunctive therapy for MDD, which include an exclusive license in the Minerva Territory with royalties payable by us to Janssen, and royalties on sales payable by Janssen to Minerva elsewhere worldwide.  (See Seltorexant – Amendment to Co-Development and License Agreement below.)

We have not received regulatory approvals to commercialize any of our product candidates, and we have not generated any revenue from the sales or license of our product candidates. We have incurred significant operating losses since inception. We expect to incur net losses and negative cash flow from operating activities for the foreseeable future in connection with the clinical development and the potential regulatory approval, infrastructure development and commercialization of our product candidates.

Clinical Update

MIN-101

Chemistry, Manufacturing and Controls (CMC) program

The CMC scale-up program for MIN-101 is ongoing to ensure consistency between the drug batches to be used during pivotal, Phase 3 testing and those that will be available for potential marketing and commercialization pending the completion of our Phase 3 trial and subsequent regulatory submission and review of a New Drug Application (NDA) for MIN-101.  The CMC program requires validation of all aspects of the manufacturing processes required to result in a drug product that consistently meets approved quality standards.

Improved Formulation

On June 22, 2017, we announced the completion of a bridging trial to select an improved, gastro-resistant, or GR formulation of MIN-101 that we plan to use in the Phase 3 clinical trial with MIN-101 and to include in the potential future submission of an NDA.

21


 

Data from the bridging trial of the selected new formulation demonstrated: bioequivalent exposure of MIN-101 based on area under the curve (AUC) as compared to the formulation used in the Phase 2b study; reduction of the maximum concentration of BFB-520, a metabolite of MIN-101, by approximately 30% in the improved formulation, thereby reducing the potential for transient QTc increases observed in the Phase 2b study at the higher dose, 64 mg, but not the lower dose, 32 mg; no observations of QTc prolongations throughout the bridging trial; no observable food effect, thus allowing administration of the drug with or without food without changing its pharmacokinetic properties; and confirmation of the overall safety and tolerability profile of MIN-101. 

As exposures of MIN-101 in the Phase 2b study and the GR formulation to be used in the Phase 3 trial are comparable, and as the two tested doses are the same for both the Phase 2b and 3 studies, we believe data from both of these studies could collectively form the basis of evaluating efficacy. We have also filed a patent application for the GR formulation, which is in addition to an already granted patent in the U.S. that provides protection until 2035. If granted, the additional patent could potentially extend exclusivity beyond 2035.

End-of-Phase 2 Meeting

In May 2017, we announced the outcome of an “end-of-Phase 2” meeting with the FDA and announced our plans to initiate Phase 3 development of MIN-101. We expect that a pivotal Phase 3 trial with MIN-101 will be initiated before the end of 2017.  Top-line results from the three-month double-blind phase of this trial are expected in the first half of 2019.

The final protocol for the Phase 3 trial has been submitted to the Investigational New Drug application (IND), and the first Institutional Review Board (IRB) approval has been received for the study in the U.S.  The Phase 3 trial design will be a 12-week, double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled, monotherapy study testing two doses of MIN-101 in patients with negative symptoms and a diagnosis of schizophrenia. To be eligible for the study, patients will be required to have stable negative and positive symptoms over several months prior to enrollment, with a specified minimum threshold baseline score on the negative sub-scale of the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale, or PANSS. After the double-blind phase, patients may enter a 40-week open label extension phase in which all patients will receive active treatment. This multi-center, international trial is expected to enroll approximately 500 patients at approximately 60 clinical sites across the U.S. and Europe, with 30 percent of patients coming from the U.S.

Breakthrough Therapy Designation

In April 2017, we applied for Breakthrough Therapy designation for MIN-101 for the treatment of negative symptoms of schizophrenia.  In subsequent correspondence, although denying our request, the FDA confirmed that treatment of negative symptoms of schizophrenia meets the criteria for a serious or life threatening disease.  Our development priority is the initiation and conduct of the Phase 3 trial on a timely basis, based on input provided by the FDA earlier this year. We are on schedule to initiate this trial in the fourth quarter of 2017.  Our ongoing interactions with the FDA may include discussion of future regulatory strategies.

Phase 2b Trial

In May 2016, we announced top line results from a prospective Phase 2b, 12-week, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled parallel clinical trial evaluating the efficacy, safety and tolerability of MIN-101 as monotherapy in patients with negative symptoms of schizophrenia using the pentagonal structure model, or PSM, of PANSS.  These negative symptoms, for which no approved treatment is currently available, affect the majority of schizophrenic patients and can persist over their lifetimes. A total of 244 patients were randomized in equal groups to receive daily doses of MIN-101 32 mg, MIN-101 64 mg or placebo at 32 clinical sites in Russia and five European countries. To participate in the trial, patients were required to have stable positive and negative symptoms for three months prior to entering the study, a PANSS negative sub-score greater than or equal to 20, and scores < 4 on the following PANSS items: excitement, hyperactivity, hostility, suspiciousness, uncooperativeness and poor impulse control.  All three cohorts were balanced with respect to demographic and baseline disease characteristics.

The study met its primary endpoint, as we observed a statistically significant benefit of MIN-101 over placebo in improving negative symptoms as measured by the PSM of PANSS. The effect was observed for both doses tested: 32 mg: p ≤ 0.024 with an effect size of 0.45, and 64 mg: p ≤ 0.004 with effect size of 0.57.

We also observed a statistically significant benefit of MIN-101 over placebo on the PANSS three factors negative symptoms subscale for both doses tested: 32 mg: p ≤ 0.006, with an effect size of 0.54, and 64 mg: p ≤ 0.001 with an effect size of 0.70. 

Furthermore, we observed the statistically significant benefit of MIN-101 over placebo on the PANSS total score (not significant for the 32 mg dose; p ≤ 0.003 for the 64 mg dose), with effect sizes of 0.34 and 0.57, respectively.

22


 

The consistency and robustness of the effect was also supported by the observed statistically significant benefit of MIN-101 over placebo in multiple other secondary endpoints as measured by the following: the PANSS general psychopathology subscale, Brief Negative Symptoms Scale total score, Clinical Global Impression of Severity, Clinical Global Impression of Improvement, Personal and Social Performance and Brief Assessment of Cognition in Schizophrenia (BACS). Positive symptoms were observed to remain stable, and the absence of extra-pyramidal symptoms (EPS) throughout the three month trial is consistent with the hypothesis that MIN-101 has a direct and specific effect on negative symptoms rather than an indirect effect mediated by improvements of positive symptoms.

Discontinuation criteria based on QTcF prolongation were incorporated in the protocol. Two patients out of 162 who received MIN-101 were discontinued based upon these criteria; both of these patients received the higher dose (64 mg). 

Patients who completed the 12-week double-blind core phase of this study were provided the opportunity to enter into a 24-week, open-label extension phase.  The extension phase was completed during the third quarter of 2016, and we announced data from the extension phase in October 2016. Data generated during the extension period were intended to provide long-term supportive evidence of safety and efficacy and to complement the statistically significant results obtained during the core phase.

During the extension phase, all patients received either 32 mg or 64 mg of MIN-101.  Patients who received placebo in the core phase were randomized to one of these two doses at the beginning of the extension phase.  One hundred forty-two patients from the treatment and placebo groups in the core phase entered the extension phase, with 88 patients completing the extension. Seventy patients received 32 mg and 72 patients received 64 mg during the extension.  

Negative symptoms, assessed based on the PANSS PSM, were observed to continue to improve during the extension phase, as shown by a reduction from the study start for the 32 and 64 mg-treated groups of 5.5 points and 4.9 points, respectively.

Positive symptoms were observed to remain stable throughout the study, as measured by PANSS positive symptom scores. The absence of modification of positive symptoms and the favorable safety and tolerability profile are consistent with the hypothesis that MIN-101 has a direct and specific effect on negative symptoms. General psychopathology was observed to improve during the extension phase for the 32 and 64 mg groups, as shown by reductions in the PANSS general psychopathology subscale score.  

MIN-101 was generally reported to be well tolerated through the entire 24-week extension phase and no patient was discontinued for QTc increases. In the extension phase, we also observed that MIN-101 at the doses tested did not have an effect on EPS, prolactin or weight gain and thus confirmed over a longer period of treatment that we did not observe those common side effects.

Additional data analyses from the Phase 2b trial were presented at the 55th Annual Meeting of the American College of Neuropsychopharmacology, or ACNP in December 2016. These analyses concluded that MIN-101 has a direct effect on negative symptoms (rather than an indirect or pseudo effect secondary to improvements in other symptoms) as supported by the stability observed in positive symptoms, the absence of EPS and the persistence of this direct effect even after controlling for improvements in depressive symptoms.  Researchers noted that since phenomena similar to negative symptoms are manifest in many neuro-psychiatric disorders and in brain degenerative disorders such as Alzheimer’s disease and Parkinson’s disease, future trials with MIN-101 could be designed to explore its potential benefit in these patient populations.

In post-hoc analysis presented at ACNP, improvement in negative symptoms was shown to be greatest among younger patients.  This finding supports the potential therapeutic benefit of MIN-101 in patients with schizophrenia who are beginning to manifest these symptoms.  It is also consistent with research showing that chronic pharmacotherapeutic intervention in schizophrenia, which includes atypical antipsychotics to treat acute positive symptoms, becomes less effective as patients age and suffer long-term consequences of the disease and side effects of current treatment options, particularly the blockade of dopamine neurotransmitter pathways in the brain.

Additional results presented at ACNP suggest a benefit of treatment with MIN-101 in improving cognitive function in schizophrenia patients with predominant negative symptoms.  Cognitive function was evaluated using the BACS scale. Cognitive impairment, a core feature of schizophrenia, affects up to 75% of patients and is believed to be a good predictor of functional outcome.

Seltorexant (MIN-202)

Amendment to Co-Development and License Agreement with Janssen

In June 2017, we entered into an agreement with Janssen to amend our Co-Development and License Agreement for seltorexant (the “Amendment”).  The effectiveness of the Amendment was contingent upon approval of its terms by the European Commission and the closing of the acquisition of Actelion by affiliates of Janssen.  These conditions were subsequently met, and the agreement became effective on August 29, 2017.

23


 

Under the amended agreement, Janssen has waived its right to royalties on seltorexant insomnia sales in the European Union, Switzerland, Liechtenstein, Iceland and Norway (the “Minerva Territory”). We retain all of our rights to seltorexant, including commercialization of the molecule for the treatment of insomnia and as an adjunctive therapy for MDD, which include an exclusive license in the Minerva Territory, with royalties payable by us to Janssen. Royalties on sales outside of the Minerva Territory are payable by Janssen to us. Janssen made an upfront payment to us of $30 million upon the effectiveness of the Amendment and agreed to make a $20 million payment at the start of a Phase 3 insomnia trial for seltorexant and a $20 million payment when 50% of the patients are enrolled in this trial. Janssen further agreed to waive the remaining payments due from us until completion of the Phase 2 development of seltorexant. The $30 million payment and $11.2 million in previously accrued collaborative expenses, which were forgiven upon the effective date of the agreement, will be earned and recognized as revenue as the services are performed from the commencement of Phase 3 development to the completion of the development activities using the proportional performance method. The $30 million payment along with the $11.2 million previously accrued collaborative expenses have been included under deferred revenue on our balance sheet at September 30, 2017.

As a result of the Amendment, we assumed strategic control for the clinical development of seltorexant in insomnia under the Phase 2 development program, but we have no further financial obligations until the Phase 2b development milestone is complete, which is expected to occur in the second half of 2019. Upon completion of this development milestone, referred to as “Decision Point 4”, We have the right to opt-out of the agreement and collect a royalty on worldwide sales of seltorexant in the single digits with no further obligations to Janssen.  If we elect to continue to Phase 3, we would be obligated to fund the clinical trials related to insomnia, and receive $40 million in milestone payments from Janssen, and would also be responsible for 40% of the development costs in the Phase 3 MDD program. In connection with the Amendment, we also repurchased all of the approximately 3.9 million shares of our stock previously owned by Johnson & Johnson Innovation-JJDC Inc. at a per share price of $0.0001, for an aggregate purchase price of approximately $389.  

Phase 2b Trials in MDD and insomnia

On September 5, 2017, we announced the enrollment of the first patient in a Phase 2b trial of seltorexant as adjunctive therapy to antidepressants in adult patients with MDD who have responded inadequately to antidepressant therapy.  The primary objectives of this multi-center, double-blind, randomized, parallel group, placebo-controlled, adaptive-dose finding study are to assess the dose-response relationship and antidepressant effects of up to three doses of seltorexant and to assess the safety and tolerability of seltorexant compared to placebo. The trial consists of three phases: a screening phase lasting up to four weeks, a six-week double-blind treatment phase and a two-week post-treatment follow-up phase. We plan to enroll approximately 280 patients at approximately 85 clinical sites in the U.S., Europe, Russia and Japan.

We plan to initiate two additional clinical trials of seltorexant before the end of 2017, including a second Phase 2b trial in MDD and a Phase 2b trial in insomnia.  

MIN-117

Phase 2b Trial

Building upon the results of the previous Phase 2a trial with MIN-117 in Europe, we are planning to initiate a Phase 2b trial in MDD the U.S. and Europe in early 2018. We expect to enroll patients with MDD who also have symptoms of anxiety.  In preparation for this trial, a food effect study is currently ongoing with MIN-117 under our IND.  

Phase 2a Trial

In May 2016, we announced top line results from a Phase 2a clinical trial in MDD with MIN-117. Data from this trial were subsequently presented at the ACNP Annual Meeting in December 2016.  This study was a four-arm, parallel-group, randomized double-blind, placebo- and positive-control trial which tested two daily administered doses of MIN-117: 0.5 mg and 2.5 mg. The study included 84 patients (21 per arm) with moderate to severe MDD in four European countries. The goals of the trial were to test efficacy, safety and tolerability of MIN-117 over six weeks of treatment. The antidepressant paroxetine was used as an active control and confirmed assay sensitivity. Change on the Montgomery-Asberg Depression Rating Scale, or MADRS, was used as the main outcome measurement. As established prospectively in the statistical analysis plan, this trial was designed for signal detection and effect size estimation.  As such, the study was not powered to demonstrate statistically significant differences between MIN-117 and placebo.

We observed the dose-dependent benefit of MIN-117 over placebo as measured by change in the MADRS.  We observed that MIN-117 at the 0.5 mg daily dose had an effect size, as compared to the placebo group, of 0.24 while the 2.5 mg daily dose had an effect size of 0.34.  This magnitude of effect size is similar to those observed with currently marketed antidepressants.  Improvement in

24


 

MADRS with MIN-117 against placebo was observed at two weeks. Furthermore, data also showed that 24% of the patients treated with 2.5 mg of MIN-117 achieved remission as prospectively defined.

Both doses of MIN-117 were reported to be well tolerated, and the incidence and types of side effects did not differ significantly between the MIN-117 group and the placebo group.  No unexpected adverse events were reported. Treatment with MIN-117 was not associated with cognitive impairment, sexual dysfunction, suicidal ideation or weight gain.

Pharmacodynamic measurements based on sleep recordings showed that MIN-117 preserved sleep continuity and architecture and therefore is not expected to have detrimental effects on rapid eye movement sleep distribution and duration.

MIN-301

In January 2015, we announced results from a non-human primate study showing that treatment with an analog of MIN-301 resulted in improvements in a range of symptoms associated with a Parkinson’s disease model in primates. The results confirmed the beneficial effects of MIN-301 in non-primate preclinical models.  We believe these data provide support for advancing MIN-301 into clinical trials for the treatment of Parkinson’s disease in humans. Building upon these data, we are continuing to conduct preclinical development with MIN-301.  We are continuing to conduct preclinical studies in preparation for an IND or Investigational Medicinal Product Dossier (IMPD) filing, with a Phase 1 study expected to commence thereafter.

Financial Overview

Revenue. None of our product candidates have been approved for commercialization and we have not received any revenue in connection with the sale or license of our product candidates. We are evaluating the revenue implications of our Amendment to Co-Development and License Agreement with Janssen.

Research and Development Expense. Research and development expenses consists of costs incurred in connection with the development of our product candidates, including: fees paid to consultants and clinical research organizations, or CROs, including in connection with our non-clinical and clinical trials, and other related clinical trial fees, such as for investigator grants, patient screening, laboratory work, clinical trial database management, clinical trial material management and statistical compilation and analysis; licensing fees; costs related to acquiring clinical trial materials; costs related to compliance with regulatory requirements; and costs related to salaries, benefits, bonuses and stock-based compensation granted to employees in research and development functions. We expense research and development costs as they are incurred.

In the future, we expect research and development expenses to continue to be our largest category of operating expenses and to increase as we continue our planned pre-clinical and clinical trials for our product candidates and as we hire additional research and development staff.

Completion dates and completion costs can vary significantly for each product candidate and are difficult to predict. We anticipate we will make determinations as to which programs to pursue and how much funding to direct to each program on an ongoing basis in response to the scientific and clinical success or failure of each product candidate, the estimated costs to continue the development program relative to our available resources, as well as an ongoing assessment as to each product candidate’s commercial potential. We will need to raise additional capital or may seek additional product collaborations in the future in order to complete the development and commercialization of our product candidates.

General and Administrative Expense. General and administrative expenses consist principally of costs for functions in executive, finance, legal, auditing and taxes. Our general and administrative expenses include salaries, bonuses, facility and information system costs and professional fees for auditing, accounting, consulting and legal services. General and administrative costs also include non-cash stock-based compensation expense as part of our compensation strategy to attract and retain qualified staff.

We expect to continue to incur general and administrative expenses related to operating as a publicly-traded company, including increased audit and legal fees, costs of compliance with securities, corporate governance and other regulations, investor relations expenses and higher insurance premiums. In addition, we expect to incur additional costs as we hire personnel and enhance our infrastructure to support the anticipated growth of our business.

Foreign Exchange (Losses) Gains. Foreign exchange (losses) gains are comprised primarily of losses and gains of foreign currency transactions related to clinical trial expenses denominated in Euros. Since our current clinical trials are conducted in Europe, we incur certain expenses in Euros and record these expenses in U.S. dollars at the time the liability is incurred. Changes in the applicable foreign currency rate between the date an expense is recorded and the payment date is recorded as a foreign currency loss or gain. We expect to continue to incur future expenses denominated in Euros as certain of our planned clinical trials are expected to be conducted in Europe.

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Investment Income. Investment income consists of income earned on our cash equivalents and marketable securities (current and non-current).

Interest Expense. Interest expense consists of interest incurred under our current outstanding loan with Oxford Finance LLC, or Oxford, and Silicon Valley Bank, or SVB.

Results of Operations

Comparison of Three Months Ended September 30, 2017 versus September 30, 2016

Research and Development Expenses

Total research and development expenses were $9.0 million for the three months ended September 30, 2017 compared to $5.9 million for the same period in 2016, an increase in total expense of $3.1 million.  Research and development expense in the three months ended September 30, 2017 and 2016 included non-cash stock-based compensation expenses of $0.5 million and $0.3 million, respectively. This increase in research and development expenses primarily reflects higher development expenses under the seltrorexant program for the Phase 2 clinical trial, increased expenses for the MIN-101 program and an increase in non-cash stock-based compensation expenses.

General and Administrative Expenses

Total general and administrative expenses were $2.5 million for the three months ended September 30, 2017 compared to $2.4 million for the same period in 2016, an increase of approximately $0.1 million. General and administrative expense in the three months ended September 30, 2017 and 2016 included non-cash stock-based compensation expenses of $0.8 million and $0.7 million, respectively. This increase was primarily due to an increase in professional fees during the three months ended September 30, 2017.  

Foreign Exchange Losses

Foreign exchange losses were $9 thousand for the three months ended September 30, 2017 compared to $3 thousand for the same period in 2016, an increased loss of $6 thousand. The loss was primarily due to clinical activities denominated in Euros.

Investment Income

Investment income was $294 thousand for the three months ended September 30, 2017 compared to $70 thousand for the same period in 2016, an increase of $224 thousand. This increase was due to an increase in investment income on cash equivalents and marketable securities (current and non-current).

Interest Expense

Interest expense was $0.1 million for the three months ended September 30, 2017 compared to $0.3 million for the same period in 2016, a decrease of $0.2 million. This decrease was due to a lower outstanding principal balance on our Term A loans.

Comparison of Nine Months Ended September 30, 2017 versus September 30, 2016

Research and Development Expenses

Total research and development expenses were $23.7 million for the nine months ended September 30, 2017 compared to $13.9 million for the same period in 2016, an increase in total expense of $9.8 million. Research and development expense in the nine months ended September 30, 2017 and 2016 included non-cash stock-based compensation expenses of $1.5 million and $0.7 million, respectively. This increase in research and development expenses primarily reflects higher development expenses under the seltrorexant program for the Phase 2 clinical trial, increased expenses for the MIN-101 program, an increase in personnel costs and an increase in non-cash stock-based compensation expenses. These amounts were partially offset by lower costs due to the completion of our Phase 2a clinical trial of MIN-117.

General and Administrative Expenses

Total general and administrative expenses were $7.9 million for the nine months ended September 30, 2017 compared to $7.0 million for the same period in 2016, an increase of approximately $0.9 million. General and administrative expense in the nine months ended

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September 30, 2017 and 2016 included non-cash stock-based compensation expenses of $2.3 million and $1.8 million, respectively. This increase was primarily due to an increase in professional fees and an increase in non-cash stock-based compensation expenses during the nine months ended September 30, 2017.

Foreign Exchange Losses

Foreign exchange losses were $46 thousand for the nine months ended September 30, 2017 compared to $28 thousand for the same period in 2016, an increased loss of $18 thousand. The loss was primarily due to certain expenses of Mind-NRG and clinical activities denominated in Euros.

Investment Income

Investment income was $0.5 million for the nine months ended September 30, 2017 compared to $0.1 million for the same period in 2016, an increase of $0.4 million. The increase was due to investment income on cash equivalents and marketable securities (current and non-current).

Interest Expense

Interest expense was $0.5 million for the nine months ended September 30, 2017 compared to $0.8 million for the same period in 2016, a decrease of $0.3 million. The decrease was due to a lower outstanding principal balance on our Term A loans.

Liquidity and Capital Resources

Sources of Liquidity

We have incurred losses and cumulative negative cash flows from operations since our inception in April 2007 and, as of September 30, 2017, we had an accumulated deficit of approximately $164.5 million. We anticipate that we will continue to incur net losses for the foreseeable future as we continue the development and potential commercialization of our product candidates and to support our operations as a public company. At September 30, 2017, we had approximately $143.3 million in cash, cash equivalents and marketable securities (current and non-current). We believe that our existing cash, cash equivalents and marketable securities (current and non-current) will be sufficient to meet our cash commitments for at least the next 12 months after the date that the interim condensed financial statements are issued. The process of drug development can be costly and the timing and outcomes of clinical trials is uncertain. The assumptions upon which we have based our estimates are routinely evaluated and may be subject to change. The actual amount of our expenditures will vary depending upon a number of factors including but not limited to the design, timing and duration of future clinical trials, the progress of our research and development programs and the level of financial resources available. We have the ability to adjust our operating plan spending levels based on the timing of future clinical trials which will be predicated upon adequate funding to complete the trials.

Sources of Funds

Amendment to Co-Development and License Agreement with Janssen

On August 29, 2017, the European Commission approved the Amendment to our Co-Development and License Agreement with Janssen under which Janssen made an upfront payment to us of $30 million in August 2017 and agreed to make a $20 million payment at the start of a Phase 3 insomnia trial for seltorexant and a $20 million payment when 50% of the patients are enrolled in this trial. Janssen further agreed to waive the remaining payments due from us until the completion of certain Phase 2b trials, including $11.2 million in previously accrued collaborative expenses. In connection with the Amendment, we also repurchased all of the approximately 3.9 million shares of our stock previously owned by Johnson & Johnson Innovation-JJDC Inc. at a per share price of $0.0001, for an aggregate purchase price of approximately $389.

Public Offering of Common Stock

On July 5, 2017, we closed a public offering of common stock, in which we issued and sold 5,750,000 shares of our common stock, including 750,000 shares sold pursuant to the underwriters’ full exercise of their option to purchase additional shares, at a public offering price of $7.75, for aggregate gross proceeds to us of $44.6 million. All of the shares issued and sold in this public offering were registered under the Securities Act pursuant to a registration statement on Form S-3 (File No. 333-205764) and a related prospectus and prospectus supplement, in each case filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission. We incurred $3.0 million in

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underwriting discounts and commissions and transaction costs, which will be included as a component of additional paid-in capital, resulting in net proceeds of approximately $41.6 million.

Exercise of Warrants

In January, February, June and December 2016 and in March 2017, certain investors in our March 2015 private placement exercised their warrants and received an aggregate of 5,673,758 shares of our common stock. We received gross proceeds of approximately $32.7 million from the exercise of these warrants.

Uses of Funds

To date, we have not generated any revenue. We do not know when, or if, we will generate any revenue from sales of our products or royalty payments from our collaboration with Janssen. We do not expect to generate significant revenue from product sales unless and until we obtain regulatory approval of and commercialize any of our product candidates. At the same time, we expect our expenses to increase in connection with our ongoing development activities, particularly as we continue the research, development and clinical trials of, and seek regulatory approval for, our product candidates. We also expect to continue to incur costs associated with operating as a public company. In addition, subject to obtaining regulatory approval of any of our product candidates, we expect to incur significant commercialization expenses for product sales, marketing, manufacturing and distribution.

Until such time, if ever, as we can generate substantial revenue from product sales, we expect to finance our cash needs through a combination of equity offerings, debt financings, government or other third‑party funding, commercialization, marketing and distribution arrangements and other collaborations, strategic alliances and licensing arrangements. To the extent that we raise additional capital through the sale of equity or convertible debt securities, the ownership interests of our common stockholders will be diluted, and the terms of these securities may include liquidation or other preferences that adversely affect the rights of our common stockholders. Additional debt financing, if available, may involve agreements that include covenants limiting or restricting our ability to take specific actions, such as incurring additional debt, making capital expenditures or declaring dividends. If we raise additional funds through government or other third‑party funding, commercialization, marketing and distribution arrangements or other collaborations, strategic alliances or licensing arrangements with third parties, we may have to relinquish valuable rights to our technologies, future revenue streams, research programs or product candidates or to grant licenses on terms that may not be favorable to us. There can be no assurance that such additional funding, if available, can be obtained on terms acceptable to us. If we are unable to obtain additional financing, future operations would need to be scaled back or discontinued. We believe that our existing cash, cash equivalents and marketable securities (current and non-current) will be sufficient to meet our cash commitments for at least the next 12 months after the date that the interim condensed financial statements are issued. The timing of future capital requirements depends upon many factors including the size and timing of future clinical trials, the timing and scope of any strategic partnering activity and the progress of other research and development activities.

Under our $10.0 million Term A Loan, we have made principal repayments of approximately $5.2 million. We expect to make additional principal repayments of approximately $1.3 million in 2017 and $3.5 million in 2018, in accordance with the terms of the agreement.

Cash Flows

The table below summarizes our significant sources and uses of cash for the nine months ended September 30, 2017 and 2016:

 

 

 

Nine Months Ended

 

 

 

September 30,

 

 

 

2017

 

 

2016

 

 

 

(dollars in millions)

 

Net cash provided by (used in):

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Operating activities

 

$

12.0

 

 

$

(16.7

)

Investing activities

 

 

(107.1

)

 

 

17.8

 

Financing activities

 

 

48.4

 

 

 

76.5

 

Net (decrease) increase in cash

 

$

(46.7

)

 

$

77.6

 

 

Net Cash Provided by (Used in) Operating Activities

Net cash provided by operating activities of approximately $12.0 million during the nine months ended September 30, 2017 was primarily due to a $41.2 million increase in deferred revenue related to the Amendment, stock-based compensation expense of $3.8

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million, a $1.2 million increase in accrued expense and amortization of investments and debt discount of $0.1 million, partially offset by our net loss of $31.7 million, a decrease in accrued collaborative expense of $2.5 million, and an increase in prepaid expenses of $0.1 million.

Net cash used in operating activities of approximately $16.7 million during the nine months ended September 30, 2016 was primarily due to our net loss of $21.6 million and a $0.5 million decrease in accounts payable, partially offset by stock-based compensation expense of $2.6 million, a $1.9 million net increase in accrued expenses and accrued collaborative expenses, a decrease of $0.5 million in prepaid expense and amortization of investments and debt discount of $0.4 million.

Net Cash Provided by (Used in) Investing Activities

 

Net cash used in investing activities of approximately $107.1 million during the nine months ended September 30, 2017 was primarily due to the purchase of marketable securities of $134.5 million, partially offset by the redemption of marketable securities of $27.4 million.

 

Net cash provided by investing activities of approximately $17.8 million during the nine months ended September 30, 2016 was due to the maturity and redemption of marketable securities.

Net Cash Provided by Financing Activities

Net cash provided by financing activities of $48.4 million during the nine months ended September 30, 2017 was primarily due to the gross proceeds from the July 2017 public stock offering of $44.6 million less costs of $3.0 million, proceeds from the exercise of common stock warrants of $9.4 million and the proceeds from the exercise of common stock options of $1.1 million, partially offset by the principal repayments under the Term A loans of $3.7 million.

Net cash provided by financing activities of $76.5 million during the nine months ended September 30, 2016 was primarily due to gross proceeds from the June 2016 public stock offering of $57.5 million less costs of $3.8 million, proceeds from the exercise of common stock warrants of $22.2 million and proceeds from the sale of common stock in a private placement of $1.0 million, partially offset by the principal repayments under the Term A loans of $0.4 million.

Contractual Obligations and Commitments

In June 2017, the Company entered into an agreement with Janssen to amend its Co-Development and License Agreement for seltorexant (the “Amendment”). The effectiveness of the Amendment was contingent upon approval of its terms by the European Commission and the closing of the acquisition of Actelion by affiliates of Janssen.  These conditions were subsequently met, and the agreement became effective on August 29, 2017. Under the amendment, Janssen agreed to waive the remaining payments due from us until completion of the Phase 2b development of seltorexant.

In October 2017, the Company entered into an office sublease agreement (the “Sublease”) to sublease approximately 5,923 square feet of office space in Waltham, MA (the “Premises”). The term of the Sublease is scheduled to begin on November 1, 2017, and will expire on July 30, 2021. Estimated annual rent payable under the Sublease is approximately $0.18 million per year, which increases to $0.2 million per year during the final 12 months of the term. The Premises will be rented to the Company free of charge for the first two months of the term.

There were no other material changes in our contractual obligations and commitments from those disclosed in our Annual Report on Form 10-K for the year ended December 31, 2016 as filed with the SEC on March 13, 2017.

Off-Balance Sheet Arrangements

We did not have during the periods presented, and we do not currently have, any off-balance sheet arrangements as defined under SEC rules.

Critical Accounting Policies and Estimates

In our Annual Report on Form 10-K for the fiscal year ended December 31, 2016, our most critical accounting policies and estimates upon which our financial status depends were identified as those relating to stock-based compensation; research and development costs; in-process research and development; business combinations; goodwill; JOBS act; net operating losses and tax credit carryforwards; and

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impairment of long-lived assets. We reviewed our policies and determined that those policies remain our most critical accounting policies for the nine months ended September 30, 2017.

Recent Accounting Pronouncements

From time to time, new accounting pronouncements are issued by the Financial Accounting Standards Board, and are adopted by us as of the specified effective date. Our significant accounting policies are described in Note 2 to our condensed consolidated financial statements appearing elsewhere in this Form 10-Q. Except as described in Note 2, we believe that the impact of other recently issued accounting pronouncements will not have a material impact on consolidated financial position, results of operations, and cash flows, or do not apply to our operations.

 

 

Item 3.   Quantitative and Qualitative Disclosures about Market Risk

Market risk is the potential loss arising from adverse changes in market rates and market prices such as interest rates, foreign currency exchange rates, and changes in the market value of equity instruments. We do not believe we are currently exposed to any material market risk because the interest rate under our Term A loan is fixed, our exposure for fluctuations in foreign exchange rates is not material and we do not hold equity instruments. As of September 30, 2017, we had $107.0 million of marketable securities, which consisted primarily of corporate bonds, with fixed interest rates. These securities have a weighted-average remaining maturity of 8 months. Due to the overall short-term remaining maturities of our marketable securities, our interest rate exposure is not significant. 

Item 4.   Controls and Procedures

Evaluation of Disclosure Controls and Procedures

We maintain “disclosure controls and procedures,” as defined in Rules 13a-15(e) and 15d-15(e) under the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, or the Exchange Act, that are designed to ensure that information required to be disclosed by a company in the reports that it files or submits under the Exchange Act is recorded, processed, summarized and reported, within the time periods specified in the SEC’s rules and forms. Disclosure controls and procedures include, without limitation, controls and procedures designed to ensure that information required to be disclosed by a company in the reports that it files or submits under the Exchange Act is accumulated and communicated to our management, including its principal executive and principal financial officers, as appropriate to allow timely decisions regarding required disclosure.

Our management, with the participation of our Chief Executive Officer (principal executive officer) and Chief Financial Officer (principal financial officer), evaluated the effectiveness of our disclosure controls and procedures as of September 30, 2017. Based on the evaluation of our disclosure controls and procedures as of September 30, 2017, our Chief Executive Officer and Chief Financial Officer concluded that, as of such date, our disclosure controls and procedures were effective at a reasonable assurance level.

Changes in Internal Control over Financial Reporting

There were no other changes in internal control over financial reporting during the Company’s latest fiscal quarter that would have materially affected, or are reasonably likely to materially affect, the Company’s internal control over financial reporting.

 

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PART II

Item 1.   Legal Proceedings

From time to time, we may be subject to various legal proceedings and claims that arise in the ordinary course of our business activities. Although the results of litigation and claims cannot be predicted with certainty, as of the date of this Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q, we do not believe we are party to any claim or litigation, the outcome of which, if determined adversely to us, would individually or in the aggregate be reasonably expected to have a material adverse effect on our business. Regardless of the outcome, litigation can have an adverse impact on us because of defense and settlement costs, diversion of management resources and other factors.

Item 1A.   Risk Factors

This Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q contains forward-looking information based on our current expectations. Because our actual results may differ materially from any forward-looking statements that we make or that are made on our behalf, this section includes a discussion of important factors that could affect our actual future results, including, but not limited to, our capital resources, the progress and timing of our clinical programs, the safety and efficacy of our product candidates, risks associated with regulatory filings, risks associated with determinations made by regulatory agencies, the potential clinical benefits and market potential of our product candidates, commercial market estimates, future development efforts, patent protection, effects of healthcare reform, reliance on third parties, and other risks set forth below. The risk factors set forth below with an asterisk (*) next to the title are new risk factors or risk factors containing changes, which may be material, from the risk factors previously disclosed in Item 1A of our Annual Report on Form 10-K for the fiscal year ended December 31, 2016, as filed with the SEC.

Risks Related to Our Financial Position and Capital Requirements

*We have incurred significant losses since our inception. We expect to continue to incur losses over the next several years and may never achieve or maintain profitability.

We are a clinical development-stage biopharmaceutical company. In November 2013, we merged with Sonkei Pharmaceuticals, Inc., or Sonkei, and, in February 2014, we acquired Mind-NRG, which were also clinical development-stage biopharmaceutical companies. Investment in biopharmaceutical product development is highly speculative because it entails substantial upfront capital expenditures and significant risk that any potential product candidate will fail to demonstrate adequate effect or an acceptable safety profile, gain regulatory approval or become commercially viable. As an early stage company, we have limited experience and have not yet demonstrated an ability to successfully overcome many of the risks and uncertainties frequently encountered by companies in new and rapidly evolving fields, particularly the biopharmaceutical area. We have no products approved for commercial sale and have not generated any revenue from product sales to date, and we continue to incur significant research and development and other expenses related to our ongoing operations.

We are not profitable and have incurred losses in each period since our inception in 2007. For the nine months ended September 30, 2017, and 2016, we reported net losses of $31.7 million and $21.6 million, respectively. As of September 30, 2017, we had an accumulated deficit of $164.5 million.  

We expect to continue to incur significant losses for the foreseeable future, and we expect these losses to increase as we continue our research and development of, and seek regulatory approvals for, our product candidates. If any of our product candidates fail in clinical trials or do not gain regulatory approval, or if any of our product candidates, if approved, fail to achieve market acceptance, we may never generate revenue or become profitable. Even if we achieve profitability in the future, we may not be able to sustain profitability in subsequent periods. We may encounter unforeseen expenses, difficulties, complications, delays and other unknown factors that may adversely affect our business. The size of our future net losses will depend, in part, on the rate of future growth of our expenses and our ability to generate revenues. Our prior losses and expected future losses have had and will continue to have an adverse effect on our stockholders’ equity and working capital.

*We will require additional capital to finance our operations, which may not be available to us on acceptable terms, or at all. As a result, we may not complete the development and commercialization of our product candidates or develop new product candidates.

Our operations and the historic operations of Sonkei and Mind-NRG have consumed substantial amounts of cash since inception. We expect our research and development expenses to increase substantially in connection with our ongoing activities, particularly as we advance our product candidates into clinical trials.

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As of September 30, 2017, we had cash, cash equivalents and marketable securities (current and non-current) of $143.3 million. We believe that our existing cash, cash equivalents and marketable securities (current and non-current) will be sufficient to meet our cash commitments for at least the next 12 months after the date that the interim condensed financial statements are issued. The process of drug development can be costly and the timing and outcomes of clinical trials is uncertain. The assumptions upon which we have based our estimates are routinely evaluated and may be subject to change. The actual amount of our expenditures will vary depending upon a number of factors including but not limited to the design, timing and duration of future clinical trials, the progress of our research and development programs and the level of financial resources available.

Our future funding requirements, both short and long-term, will depend on many factors, including:

 

the initiation, progress, timing, costs and results of pre-clinical studies and clinical trials for our product candidates and future product candidates we may develop;

 

the outcome, timing and cost of seeking and obtaining regulatory approvals from the EMA, FDA, and comparable foreign regulatory authorities, including the potential for such authorities to require that we perform more studies than those that we currently expect;

 

the cost to establish, maintain, expand and defend the scope of our intellectual property portfolio, including the amount and timing of any payments we may be required to make, or that we may receive, in connection with licensing, preparing, filing, prosecution, defense and enforcement of any patents or other intellectual property rights;

 

the effect of competing technological and market developments;

 

market acceptance of any approved product candidates;

 

the costs of acquiring, licensing or investing in additional businesses, products, product candidates and technologies; and

 

the cost of establishing sales, marketing and distribution capabilities for our product candidates for which we may receive regulatory approval and that we determine to commercialize ourselves or in collaboration with our partners.

When we need to secure additional financing, such additional fundraising efforts may divert our management from our day-to-day activities, which may adversely affect our ability to develop and commercialize our product candidates. In addition, we cannot guarantee that future financing will be available in sufficient amounts or on terms acceptable to us, if at all. If we raise additional equity financing, our stockholders may experience significant dilution of their ownership interests, and the per-share value of our common stock could decline. If we engage in debt financing, we may be required to accept terms that restrict our ability to incur additional indebtedness and force us to maintain specified liquidity or other ratios. Further, the evolving and volatile global economic climate and global financial market conditions could limit our ability to raise funding and otherwise adversely impact our business or those of our collaborators and providers. If we are unable to raise additional capital in sufficient amounts or on terms acceptable to us we may have to significantly delay, scale back or discontinue the development or commercialization of one or more of our product candidates. Any of these events could significantly harm our business, financial condition and prospects.

Changes in estimates regarding fair value of intangible assets may result in an adverse impact on our results of operations.

We test goodwill and in-process research and development for impairment annually or more frequently if changes in circumstances or the occurrence of events suggest impairment exists. The test for impairment of in-process research and development requires us to make several estimates about fair value, most of which are based on projected future cash flows. Changes in these estimates may result in the recognition of an impairment loss in our results of operations. An impairment analysis is performed whenever events or changes in circumstances indicate that the carrying amount of any individual asset may not be recoverable. For example, if we or our counterparties fail to perform our respective obligations under an agreement, or if we lack sufficient funding to develop our product candidates, an impairment may result. In addition, any significant change in market conditions, estimates or judgments used to determine expected future cash flows that indicate a reduction in carrying value may give rise to impairment in the period that the change becomes known.

*We plan to use potential future operating losses and our federal and state net operating loss, or NOL, carryforwards to offset taxable income from revenue generated from operations or corporate collaborations. However, our ability to use existing NOL carryforwards may be limited as a result of issuance of equity securities.

As of December 31, 2016, we had approximately $49.3 million of Federal NOL carryforwards. These Federal NOL carryforwards will begin to expire at various dates beginning in 2027, if not utilized. We plan to use our operating losses to offset any potential future taxable income generated from operations or collaborations. To the extent we generate taxable income, we plan to use our existing NOL carryforwards and future losses to offset income that would otherwise be taxable. If substantial changes in ownership have occurred, there could be annual limitations on the amount of carryforwards that can be realized in future periods. We have not performed a detailed analysis to determine whether an ownership change occurred upon consummation of the merger between us and Sonkei, upon the acquisition of Mind-NRG or our initial public offering or the concurrent private placements. However, as a result of

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these transactions, it is likely that an ownership change has occurred. Therefore, it is likely that some or all of our existing NOL carryforwards would be limited by the provisions of Section 382 of the United States Internal Revenue Code of 1986, as amended. Further, state NOL carryforwards may be similarly limited. We had approximately $41.4 million of state net operating carryforwards at December 31, 2016. It is also possible that future changes in ownership, including as a result of subsequent sales of securities by us or our stockholders, could similarly limit our ability to utilize NOL carryforwards. It is possible that all of our existing NOL carryforwards have been or will be disallowed. Any such disallowances may result in greater tax liabilities than we would incur in the absence of such a limitation and any increased liabilities could adversely affect our business, results of operations, financial condition and cash flow.

Risks Related to Our Business and Industry

We cannot give any assurance that any of our product candidates will receive regulatory approval in a timely manner or at all, which is necessary before they can be commercialized.

The regulatory approval process is expensive and the time required to obtain approval from the EMA, FDA or other regulatory authorities in other jurisdictions to sell any product is uncertain and may take years.

Whether regulatory approval will be granted is unpredictable and depends upon numerous factors, including the substantial discretion of the regulatory authorities. Moreover, the filing of a marketing application, including a New Drug Application, or NDA, or Biologics License Application, or BLA, requires a payment of a significant user fee upon submission. The filing of marketing applications for our product candidates may be delayed due to our lack of financial resources to pay such user fee.

If, following submission, our application is not accepted for substantive review or approval, the EMA, FDA or other comparable foreign regulatory authorities may require that we conduct additional clinical or pre-clinical trials, provide additional data, manufacture additional validation batches or develop additional analytical tests methods before they will reconsider our application. If the EMA, FDA or other comparable foreign regulatory authorities requires additional studies or data, we would incur increased costs and delays in the marketing approval process, which may require us to expend more resources than we have available. In addition, the EMA, FDA or other comparable foreign regulatory authorities may not consider sufficient any additional required trials, data or information that we perform or provide, or we may decide, or be required, to abandon the program.

Moreover, policies, regulations, or the type and amount of pre-clinical and clinical data necessary to gain approval may change during the course of a product candidate’s clinical development and may vary among jurisdictions. It is possible that none of our existing product candidates or any of our future product candidates will ever obtain regulatory approval, even if we expend substantial time and resources seeking such approval.

Our product candidates could fail to receive regulatory approval for many reasons, including the following:

 

The EMA, FDA or other regulatory authorities may disagree with the design or implementation of our clinical trials. We have not yet consulted with the EMA or the FDA on the design and conduct of the clinical trials that have already been conducted or that we intend to conduct. Thus, the EMA, FDA and other comparable foreign authorities may not agree with the design or implementation of these trials. We intend to seek guidance from the EMA in relation to the European Union clinical trial program and the FDA on the design and conduct of clinical trials of our compounds when we initiate a clinical program in the United States in the future.

 

We may be unable to demonstrate to the satisfaction of the EMA, FDA or other regulatory authorities that a product candidate is safe and effective for its proposed indication.

 

The results of clinical trials may not meet the level of statistical significance required by the EMA, FDA or other regulatory authorities for approval.

 

We may be unable to demonstrate that a product candidate’s clinical and other benefits outweigh any safety risks.

 

The EMA, FDA or other regulatory authorities may disagree with our interpretation of data from pre-clinical studies or clinical trials.

 

The data collected from clinical trials of our product candidates may not be sufficient to support an NDA or other submission or to obtain regulatory approval in the United States or elsewhere.

 

The EMA, FDA or other regulatory authorities may fail to approve the manufacturing processes or facilities of third-party manufacturers with which we contract for clinical and commercial supplies.

 

The approval policies or regulations of the EMA, FDA or other regulatory authorities may significantly change in a manner rendering our clinical data insufficient for approval.

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Even if we obtain approval for a particular product, regulatory authorities may approve that product for fewer or more limited indications, including more limited patient populations, than we request, may require that contraindications, warnings, or precautions be included in the product labeling, including a black box warning, may grant approval contingent on the performance of costly post-marketing clinical trials or other post-market requirements, including risk evaluation and mitigation strategies, or REMS, or may approve a product candidate with a label that does not include the labeling claims necessary or desirable for the successful commercialization of that product. Any of the foregoing could materially harm the commercial prospects for our product candidates.

Results of earlier clinical trials may not be predictive of the results of later-stage clinical trials.

The results of pre-clinical studies and early clinical trials of our product candidates may not be predictive of the results of later-stage clinical trials. Interpretation of results from early, usually smaller, trials that suggest positive trends in some subjects, require caution. Results from later stages of clinical trials enrolling more subjects may fail to show the desired safety and efficacy results or otherwise fail to be consistent with the results of earlier trials of the same product candidate. This may occur for a variety of reasons, including differences in trial design, trial endpoints (or lack of trial endpoints in exploratory studies), subject population, number of subjects, subject selection criteria, trial duration, drug dosage and formulation or due to the lack of statistical power in the earlier trials. A number of companies in the pharmaceutical and biotechnology industries have suffered significant setbacks in advanced clinical trials due to lack of efficacy or unacceptable safety profiles, notwithstanding promising results in earlier trials.

The results of clinical trials conducted at sites outside the United States may not be accepted by the FDA and the results of clinical trials conducted at sites in the United States may not be accepted by international regulatory authorities.

We plan to conduct our clinical trials outside the United States. Although the FDA may accept data from clinical trials conducted outside the United States, acceptance of this data would be subject to certain conditions imposed by the FDA. For example, the clinical trial must be well-designed and conducted and performed by qualified investigators in accordance with ethical safeguards such as institutional review board, or IRB, or ethics committee approval and informed consent. The study population must also adequately represent the applicable United States population, and the data must be applicable to the American population and medical practice in ways that the FDA deems clinically meaningful. In addition, while clinical trials conducted outside of the United States are subject to the applicable local laws, FDA acceptance of the data from such trials will be dependent upon its determination that the trials were conducted consistent with all applicable United States laws and regulations. There can be no assurance the FDA will accept data from trials conducted outside of the United States as adequate support of a marketing application, and it is not unusual for the FDA to require some Phase 3 clinical trial data to be generated in the United States. If the FDA does not accept the data from our international clinical trials, it would likely result in the need for additional trials in the United States, which would be costly and time-consuming and could delay or permanently halt the development of one or more of our product candidates.

If we experience delays in clinical testing, we will be delayed in commercializing our product candidates, our costs may increase and our business may be harmed.

We do not know whether our clinical trials will be completed on schedule, or at all. Our product development costs will increase if we experience delays in clinical testing. Significant clinical trial delays also could shorten any periods during which we may have the exclusive right to commercialize our product candidates or allow our competitors to bring products to market before we do, which would impair our ability to successfully commercialize our product candidates and may harm our business, results of operations and prospects.

The commencement and completion of clinical development can be delayed or halted for a number of reasons, including:

 

difficulties obtaining regulatory approval to commence a clinical trial or complying with conditions imposed by a regulatory authority regarding the scope or term of a clinical trial;

 

delays in reaching or failure to reach agreement on acceptable terms with prospective clinical research organizations, or CROs, and trial sites, which can be subject to extensive negotiation and may vary significantly among different CROs and trial sites;

 

deviations from the trial protocol by clinical trial sites and investigators, or failing to conduct the trial in accordance with regulatory requirements;

 

failure of our third parties, such as CROs, to satisfy their contractual duties or meet expected deadlines;

 

insufficient or inadequate supply or quantity of product material for use in trials due to delays in the importation and manufacture of clinical supply, including delays in the testing, validation, and delivery of the clinical supply of the investigational drug to the clinical trial sites;

 

delays in identification and auditing of central or other laboratories and the transfer and validation of assays or tests to be used;

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delays in having subjects complete participation in a trial or return for post-treatment follow-up;

 

difficulties obtaining IRB or ethics committee approval to conduct a trial at a prospective site, or complying with conditions imposed by IRBs or ethics committees;